Business

Firms resisting Obama administration’s pay advice

When the Obama administration imposed restrictions on executive pay last year at some of the largest companies the government had bailed out, officials said they were aiming to set a new standard for compensation across corporate America that would discourage risky business practices.

But as firms begin to disclose last year’s bonuses ahead of annual shareholder meetings, it is becoming clear that companies across a wide range of industries are paying executives in ways that officials worry will not discourage the kind of excessive short-term risk-taking that led to the financial crisis.

The Treasury Department said it is not looking to limit the total pay executives receive. Kenneth R. Feinberg, President Obama’s special master for compensation, wants to change pay incentives, giving executives a greater stake in the long-term performance of their firms. That would mean, for example, smaller up-front cash salaries and fewer perks, more compensation in the form of company stock and a longer wait to receive it.

“I see no indication whatsoever that the business community is paying any attention to the administration’s suggestions,” said Nell Minow, co-founder of the Corporate Library, an independent corporate governance research firm. “On the contrary, I think pay is worse this year than it’s ever been.”

Full story: Administration seeks to change pay incentives at major firms – washingtonpost.com