The Daily Caller

The Daily Caller

Celebrity airbrushing [SLIDESHOW]

An epidemic of extreme airbrushing is sweeping through Hollywood. Through tools like Photoshop, stars have been digitally tweeked to glossy perfection on the cover of seemingly every magazine. This trend has not only made celebrities look like robotic Barbie dolls, but it has also created an unattainable standard of beauty in our society.

It’s quite refreshing when stars strive to expose their “realness” by refusing to be airbrushed, or by releasing the untouched versions of digital altered photographs. Holly Madison is the latest celeb to go ‘au naturael’ on the cover of this month’s Life & Style magazine. The former ‘girl next door’ and Playboy centerfold confidently posed in a bikini and refused airbrushing. She said that she’s struggled with insecurities at times, but takes pride in her curvaceous body regardless of any cellulite she may acquire.

Madison is just one of many celebrities who has decided to expose anatomical imperfections by abstaining from airbrushing. These Photoshop-free photos prove that even the most glamorously gorgeous icons have flaws, just like the rest of us.

Click an image below for larger version.
  • Kim Kardashian posed nude in Harper’s Bazaar and said the published photo was entirely un-edited. "The message of this shoot is to embrace your curves and who you are," Kim told the publication. "I feel proud if young girls look up to me and say, 'I'm curvy, and I'm proud of it now.'"
  • Jessica Simpson appeared on the cover of Marie Claire with no makeup or retouching. “I don’t have anything to prove anymore,” said the star. “What other people think of me is not my business.”
  • After posing in cutout swimsuit for a Candies advertisement, Britney Spears released the un-airbrushed photo from the shoot alongside the digitally enhanced image. The unedited photo showed the way airbrushing is used to slim and smooth nearly every inch of the body.
  • "Real Housewife" Bethenny Frankel shared this original version of her nude PETA ad in Us Weekly after her Times Square billboard was criticized for being heavily airbrushed.
  • Miss Universe 2004 and fashion model Jennifer Hawkins agreed to pose nude and un-airbrushed on the cover of February's Australian "Marie Claire." The idea of the cover was to allow "real women" to embrace their bodies, but the cover sparked public outrage despite its good intentions. Many people criticized the publications airbrush-free cover claiming that Hawkins’ perfect figure did not represent the average woman.
  • Demi Moore tweeted this original, un-edited photo (right) used for the cover of W magazine to prove that her physique was not retouched, despite contrary belief. She tweeted: "Here is the original image people my hips were not touched don't let these people bull**** you!"
  • Former playmate and ‘girl next door’ Holly Madison posed airbrush-free in Life & Style magazine. “I’ve always had a butt, and I want to keep it — cellulite and all. I’m not perfect, but I love my curves,” she said.
  • The women's magazine Redbook came under fire in July 2007 when the above un-retouched cover photo of Faith Hill surfaced. The singer said she was upset with the amount of airbrushing, but the publication stood by their editing.
  • Taylor Swift posed without makeup or airbrushing in the 2008 issue of People Magazine’s “100 Most Beautiful People.” The issue focused on promoting natural beauty, and featured a number of the world’s most attractive women without any makeup.
  • Kelly Clarkson was involved in an airbrushing scandal in 2009 when she posed on the cover of Self Magazine looking significantly slimmer. The singer, whose weight has been a target of media scrutiny, admitted she didn’t even recognize herself when she saw the heavily edited photo. Self Magazine defended the airbrushing, saying the wanted the star to “look her best.”
  • British actress Sadie Frost bared it all, sans airbrushing, for Grazia magazine. The over-forty mother of four and ex-wife of Jude Law claimed her goal was to inspire women to be proud of their bodies.