The Daily Caller

The Daily Caller
Texas Gov. Rick Perry speaks at the Republican Leadership Conference in New Orleans, Saturday, June 18, 2011. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky) Texas Gov. Rick Perry speaks at the Republican Leadership Conference in New Orleans, Saturday, June 18, 2011. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)  

Perry continues to hint at presidential run

Rick Perry is sounding more and more like a presidential candidate.

The Wall Street Journal writes about the Texas governor’s speech at the Republican Leadership Conference, during which he called for giving more power to state governments, spoke of individual liberties, and encouraged Republicans not to put social issues on the backburner.

Though Mitt Romney has been the clear frontrunner in the race for the 2012 Republican nomination, Perry has emerged recently as a potential alternative. The latest Wall Street Journal/NBC News poll showed Romney with 30 percent support and Perry with 8 percent, but that poll was taken only a short time after Perry expressed a possible interest in running.

Perry, who like New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie had denied any interest in running, sent shockwaves through the Republican field when he finally admitted to reporters he was mulling over a bid.

But he can’t raise any campaign money while the Texas state legislature is still in special session. Many of his supporters expect him to make an announcement after that session ends, which could happen this week.

Perry would certainly give Romney a run for his money. Job growth in Texas has been stellar, and he has a record of lowering taxes and balancing budgets, all of which will appeal to the Republican Party’s conservative base. (Sources: Rick Perry is running)

Several indicators of a presidential run popped up during his appearance at the conference: he asked the audience to send text messages to a number associated with his website (a method of building a contact list), threw his arms in the air at a chant of “Run, Rick, Run!” and he was accompanied by Dave Carney, formerly of Newt Gingrich’s presidential campaign and someone who many thought left the Gingrich camp to join a Perry campaign.