The Daily Caller

The Daily Caller
Photo: AP Photo: AP  

Why are recent college graduates facing an unemployment crisis?

Young adults searching for their first job are becoming frustrated and blame the economy, but some high-powered search executives think the problem is young people.

John Dick, CEO of CivicScience, a digital polling and consumer research company said, “I think a lot of it is just a general aversion to competition… so when things look bleak, like they are now, there are more ways to prevent going into the job market.

“So you are seeing people looking for extended education opportunities instead of toughing it out, throwing out a thousand resumes and going into job interviews.”

Dick said that as an employer he puts a strong emphasis on experience on a resume. But if there aren’t any jobs, young people often feel stuck.

In a recent poll for Generation Opportunity, a non-profit organization that seeks to engage, organize and mobilize young adults in the political process, 77 percent of respondents, age 18-29, were either delaying or expecting to delay a major life change or purchase due to economic factors.

The poll highlighted young people’s uneasiness about the future and reported that many of them will delay buying a home, saving for retirement, paying off student loans or other debt, going back to school or getting more education or training, changing jobs or cities, starting a family or even getting married.

The polling company, inc./WomanTrend conducted the poll for Generation Opportunity and surveyed 600 young adults. The poll has a four percent margin of error.

(Conservatives may be able to harness youth disillusionment in 2012)

“The reason why this is important is…basically those who are 18-29 are sending a message that they don’t have the confidence in the economy… [or] in their own employment situation to make a decision,” said the president of Generation Opportunity, Paul T. Conway.

Thomas L. McLane, managing director of RSR Partners, an executive search and corporate governance recruiting firm, said that there are many opportunities to boost a resume – young people just need to take them.

“They should think of where opportunities might be even if not in the direction they might want to head,” McLane said. “They might go into a housecleaning service… or go to work scooping ice cream. Those who want to work will find out where the work is.”

McLane also noted that internships, even if unpaid, are a great way for young people to get their foot in the door.

“It shows they have a willingness to work,” McLane said.

John Challenger, CEO of Challenger, Gray & Christmas, Inc., an outplacement consulting firm, said that young people usually get hit hardest in a tough economy.

“The companies have to take a chance on them to a greater degree than they do for someone who has been doing this for the last five years or ten years,” Challenger said about why employers may be more hesitant to hire a recent college graduate.

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  • Notfooledtwice

    Someone will surely reply to my statement below that Shrub ruined the economy – but Odumba turned the downturn into a depression. What do you get when you divide $44Trillion, (the real amount,) by 305 Million Americans? Global catastrophe on a Biblical scale! China and Russia already dumping our monopoly money.

  • Notfooledtwice

    Thousands of returning Veterans is going to make it harder for anyone seeking employment because they have hiring incentives. Odumba keeps on churning out his phony employment #’s and then having to revise them. And when that doesn’t work he has to change the definitions and measuring standards. He’s a joke – no-one I talk to takes him seriously anymore.I’ve filled out a hundred apps if I’ve filled out one – you know how disheartening it is to not be able to check all the veteran’s special incentives boxes and minority incentive boxes? I was self-employed, owning my own business, so when Odumba ruined the economy I had no unemployment. We self-employed get no special tax breaks – we even have to pay taxes on unsold inventory! Can’t get rid of this socialist and his NWO satanists soon enough.

  • fourleafclover

    I lived through the Jimmy Carter era and kept a job. It wasn’t as bad as the Obama era but almost. In my generation you had to be working by the time you were 19 or 23 if you went to college. By the time I was 25 i already had built a house and had put 20% down on a construction loan to do it. Now days people are getting late starts in life. I have neighbors who have 30 year olds still living at home. I would like to be young again but not in the liberal climate of the US today. Years ago I knew people with a high school education who found great jobs, got married, purchased a home, had kids, bought a boat and a place at the lake. Those days are gone. Liberal poliitics have destroyed a good thing in the US. Too much red tape and BS for businesses. It’s going to take a revolution by young folks to get the US back on track from Obama like federal government administrations. It’s too bad they may never see the day when freedoms were more plentiful and jobs were plentiful. There used to be competition between businesses for good employees. All gone.

    • MissShona

      The economy was killed during the 8-year Bush regime!

      • clw

        Yeah, that’s what we need. More Bush-Derangement-Syndrome.

      • Notfooledtwice

        You have to make allowances for Miss Shona – obviously a victim of the Democrat Party teacher’s unions.

  • hologram5

    The headline is utter BS. These kids today are NOT working harder than we did when we went to school. Back in the day we didn’t have many choices when we went to college. Most of these little fools have mommy and daddy to fall back on. MOST of us pulled 15 and 16 credits AND worked a full time job to support our spouses and children. Don’t sit there and piss on my head and tell me it’s raining.

  • clw

    “John Dick, CEO of CivicScience, a digital polling and consumer research company said, ‘I think a lot of it is just a general aversion to competition… so when things look bleak, like they are now, there are more ways to prevent going into the job market. So you are seeing people looking for extended education opportunities instead of toughing it out, throwing out a thousand resumes and going into job interviews’.”

    Well, his name is appropriate.

    Because that comment is not an idiotic BROAD GENERALIZATION of college grads, is it?! I wonder if he votes Democrat. I bet he does.

    I have a 23 and 24 year old who have worked their asses off thru HS and their first few years of college. We had no good jobs in our area ALREADY, only service and retail jobs, but under the Obama administration with it’s CONSISTENTLY GREATER THAN “8%” unemployment, things are DISMAL! I have tried to help them in their job searches but I’m equally as frustrated as they are. Same lame job postings day after day, week after week, offering “less than 40 hrs” (so they don’t have to offer benefits), and offering pay SO LOW that these kids will NEVER be able to get on their feet.

    ADD TO THAT paralyzing (liberal inspired) tax hikes and price increases in food, transportation, housing and clothing costs, and you’ve got a real situation on your hands.

    Any dumb-ass who can blame college grads (for not finding decent work) with a straight face should be run out of town on a rail, because he is a clueless idiot.

    It’s past time to get Obama and his brown-nose lackeys out of the White House and get someone in there who knows what they’re doing!

  • StargazerInSavannah

    Graduates should certainly feel uncomfortable when they venture forth into the real world with their degrees in English, Social Studies, Black Studies, Women’s Studies and the multitude of other worthless degrees promoted by Universities and their worthless Phd faculty.
    On the other hand there will be a few graduates who actually pursued a major that will be in demand. Majors graduating with degrees in Math, Physics, Chemistry, Engineering, Computer Science, Accounting, Statistics… etc. can expect that there will be many job opportunities available to them.
    Some years ago I was responsible for a faculty search for a Phd who would teach Computer Information Systems. At the time, it was impossible to find a single applicant for the position with the salary pegged at $47,500 for nine months. At the same time, the university was overwhelmed with applicants for a $25,000 Phd teaching position in the English department.
    Some degree programs have no value.
    Degrees in the so called ‘soft sciences’ are nearly as useless as are education degrees.
    Remember, that education in American schools didn’t really become a failure until the Department of Education took control and math teachers had to have a degree in education rather than a degree in mathematics.
    Big Education working with Big Teachers Unions will forever deliver failed schools.

    • wagnert in atlanta

      “Majors graduating with degrees in Math, Physics, Chemistry, Engineering, Computer Science, Accounting, Statistics… etc. can expect that there will be many job opportunities available to them.”

      Tell that to my kid who has a PhD in chemical engineering — from Georgia Tech, no less — and no job, along with several of his classmates who are either unemployed or washing lab glassware.