The Daily Caller

The Daily Caller
From left, President Barack Obama, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nev., Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., center, and Senate Majority Whip Richard Durbin of Ill.,  meet in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington, Wednesday, July 13, 2011, regarding the debt ceiling.  (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak) From left, President Barack Obama, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nev., Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., center, and Senate Majority Whip Richard Durbin of Ill., meet in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington, Wednesday, July 13, 2011, regarding the debt ceiling. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)  

Heritage Foundation comes out against McConnell plan

The Heritage Foundation came out in full force against the back-up plan proposed this week by Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell in the absence of a deal on raising the debt limit.

In a post titled “Shame on the Politically Motivated McConnell Plan to Hike Borrowing With No Spending Cuts,” vice president of domestic and economic policy David Addington, a former Dick Cheney chief of staff, accused McConnell of caving under political pressure.

Addington argued that the plan would do nothing good for the country because it would essentially allow the debt limit to be raised by more than $2 trillion.

“The McConnell Plan would put America deeper into debt and achieves nothing toward the vitally important objective of getting federal overspending and overborrowing under control,” wrote Addington.

Moreover, Addington continued, the back-up plan is not an escape route for Republicans to put the responsibility on President Obama.

“If the outcome of the current presidential-congressional negotiations over how to get spending under control is the McConnell Plan … then Senator McConnell and every congressional Republican who votes for it will bear as much political responsibility for this action as President Obama and the Democrats,” he wrote.

The bottom line for Addington? Don’t raise the debt limit without cutting spending. (House to act on Cut, Cap, Balance Act)

McConnell’s proposal, if adopted, would give President Obama the authority to submit requests to raise the debt limit. Congress would have to vote to block the increases, but it would be subject to a veto by Obama.

Earlier this week, McConnell’s plan brought swift backlash from conservatives, who accused the minority leader of selling out and failing to promote real reforms.

  • mkurbo

    He should resign. That is old Washington thinking rearing its ugly head – let’s just kick the can a little bit further…

    ..It’s time to vote out all the old “inside the beltway” politicians and vote in a balanced budget amendment, cut the Fed. Gov. by 50%, and pass the flat tax system.

  • teapartypatriot

    mcconnell MUST GO. This Ruling Class Establishmentarian has repeated shown that he is an out-of-touch, mealy-mouthed wimp who wants to protect his establishment powers against the power of the people. To properly deal with the “Chump-in-Chief” we don’t need a Senate GOP Leader Chump. We need somebody with a pair who will STOP and REVERSE the extremist agenda of the socialists. mcconnell isn’t that person.

    I’d say, let’s go for the GOLD: Jim DeMint for Senate GOP Leader. He won’t only STOP and REVERSE the radicals, he’ll have them scouring in a corner.

  • JoeJ

    McConnell is an elitist country club mouthpiece – he represents “old money.” (He is not a Wall Street oligarch type – those people have Obama in their pocket.)

    His plan would extent the power of the executive at the expense of congress – that is hardly what America needs. That takes power away from the people.

    McConnell types want the status quo to continue on – they do not want major changes in who pays for what. Just like in Europe – they want the middleclass taxpayer to eventually bare the burden of all the US debt.

  • Humorless

    Be a real embarassment to Heritage now…if the Congressional GOP passed it, wouldn’t it???

  • rigdum funidos

    McConnell is a very smart guy, and it is true that his plan plays Pin the Tail on the Democrat without solving the budget problem. But it looks like the only way to solve that problem is with a new Senate and new President, since the Dems don’t appear to be willing to cut anything really, even the rate of growth. Maybe the right idea is to just get off the bus and let them drive it off the cliff.

    • pansycritter

      So, if the water was too deep and the surface too rough and there was a chance that sharks were nearby, you’d let your wife drown.

  • commonsensemajority

    Excellent news, I was worried that McConnell’s plan was one that had been formulated by the Heritage Foundation in the background. Good to know that this wasn’t the case.

    We have a little insight into McConnell from GWB, who stated in his book (Decision Points) that McConnell was putting pressure on him prior to the 2006 mid-terms to reduce troops in Iraq (this was at a pivotal time when backbone was required to enact the much needed surge).

    Good to see the House moving on vote(s) next week. Let bills pass the House, ignore any further summons from Obama, and let Obama decide whether he will sign-on or whether he will be the one responsible for a default (and a lowered credit rating).

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