The Daily Caller

The Daily Caller
Amanda Knox, right, is escorted by a police officer as she arrives for an hearing of her appeals case at the Perugia court, Italy, Monday, Sept. 5, 2011. The appeals case of Amanda Knox, the American student convicted of killing her British roommate, resumed Monday with lawyers questioning independent experts who cast doubt on the evidence used in the first trial. The 24-year-old from Seattle who has been behind bars since the November 2007 murder was in the Perugia courtroom, as was her co-defendant and onetime boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito. Ahead of the hearing, the first after the summer break, the sister of victim Meredith Kercher issued a letter asking the appeals court to assess "every single (piece) of evidence" so that justice can be done. (AP Photo/Stefano Medici) Amanda Knox, right, is escorted by a police officer as she arrives for an hearing of her appeals case at the Perugia court, Italy, Monday, Sept. 5, 2011. The appeals case of Amanda Knox, the American student convicted of killing her British roommate, resumed Monday with lawyers questioning independent experts who cast doubt on the evidence used in the first trial. The 24-year-old from Seattle who has been behind bars since the November 2007 murder was in the Perugia courtroom, as was her co-defendant and onetime boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito. Ahead of the hearing, the first after the summer break, the sister of victim Meredith Kercher issued a letter asking the appeals court to assess "every single (piece) of evidence" so that justice can be done. (AP Photo/Stefano Medici)  

Live tweeting from the Amanda Knox murder appeal in Italy

Photo of Stephen Robert Morse
Stephen Robert Morse
Tow-Knight Fellow in Entrepreneurial Journalism , The City University of New York

Journalist and documentarian Stephen Robert Morse is in Perugia, Italy, reporting exclusively for The Daily Caller on the murder appeal of American student Amanda Knox. Morse will be live-tweeting the court proceedings as circumstances permit.

In December 2009 an Italian court convicted Knox of sexually assaulting and murdering her British roommate in Italy. She has steadfastly maintained her innocence.

The appeal will likely center on reconsideration of forensic evidence that Knox’s legal team says was mishandled, contaminated, and ignored. Morse reported September 14¬†on growing concerns about the competence of Italian forensic police, and on a police wiretap recording which emerged after Knox’s conviction and points to her innocence.