The Daily Caller

The Daily Caller
U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder speaks during the Secretary-General U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder speaks during the Secretary-General's Symposium on International Counter-Terrorism Conference during the 66th session of the General Assembly at United Nations headquarters on Monday, Sept. 19, 2011. (AP Photo/Andrew Burton)  

New book calls out ‘racial agenda of the Obama Justice Department’

President Barack Obama and Attorney General Eric Holder face fiery race-based criticisms in a new book about their selective enforcement of civil rights.

In “Injustice: Exposing the Racial Agenda of the Obama Justice Department,” former Department of Justice Civil Rights Division attorney J. Christian Adams describes how racist radicals have hijacked the DOJ and rarely enforce laws when it’s not politically beneficial for them to do so.

The book begins during the Bush administration with a story from Noxubee County, Miss., where Adams joined fellow Civil Rights Division attorney Chris Coates and others from the DOJ in investigating discrimination against white voters by a black leader. Inside the DOJ, especially in the Civil Rights Division, Coates and Adams faced adamant opposition to investigating and litigating the Noxubee case. Adams says it wasn’t because there was a lack of evidence or because the accusations were frivolous — according to him, it was because it was a case about discrimination against white people, and had been for several elections. Adams says this was a real-life example of “reverse racism.”

Adams argues that because of Obama and Holder’s staffing and selective enforcement, the Noxubee case is just the beginning, and Americans should be ready for an onslaught of similar situations in coming years. In a chapter titled “Personnel is Policy,” Adams makes the case that Obama and Holder understand that a racist and extremist influence they install at the DOJ now will last for decades in the form of career attorneys.

“Litigation was brought against [Noxubee County Democratic Party Chairman] Ike Brown largely thanks to the efforts of one Department of Justice employee and the support he received from DOJ political appointees,” Adams writes. “This bears out an old axiom: Personnel is policy. And you have to hand it to Barack Obama — he understands this perfectly.”

Adams said resumes from the 130 newly hired lawyers in Eric Holder’s Civil Rights division indicate they “were deeply steeped in left-wing activism” before they got what are meant to be apolitical careers at the DOJ. Politically motivated pushes like the one to drop the case against the New Black Panther Party are inevitable moving forward, Adams argues, if nothing is done to stop racists and left-wing extremists from populating the DOJ. Adams also argues that these extremists will allow corruption like what happened in Noxubee to fester if they’re allowed to stay in unchallenged positions of power.

“Incidents of racially charged vote fraud and voter intimidation are by no means limited to Noxubee County and Philadelphia,” Adams writes. “While hardly ever attracting media attention — the Panther case was an exception in that regard — these cases for years have sparked pitched battles inside the Department of Justice between those who believe in equal enforcement of the law and those who do not.”

Inside the DOJ, Adams says there are scores of career staffers — many more are getting hired under Obama — with radical beliefs. For instance, Adams tells readers how Civil Rights Division attorney Charla Jackson thinks picnics are racist.

“The word picnic, you see, is derived from an event familiar to white Americans, or so Jackson believes,” Adams writes. “Around a century ago, large numbers of white folks would supposedly gather at a park, almost always in a small, southern town. They brought lemonade, table-cloths, ham sandwiches, cold chicken, potato salad — and an important item in this alternate universe — lynching rope.”

Jackson believes that the picnics would end, and the white people would go lynch black people nearby. “Naturally, no such event ever really happened at any picnic, much less comprised some sort of murderous American tradition,” Adams corrects Jackson.