Politics
Herman Cain at a campaign stop in Jackson, Tenn. (Gracie Ferrell/TheDC) Herman Cain at a campaign stop in Jackson, Tenn. (Gracie Ferrell/TheDC)  

Herman Cain admits ‘some people will pay more’ under 9-9-9

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Alex Pappas
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      Alex Pappas

      Alex Pappas is a Washington D.C.-based political reporter for The Daily Caller. He has also written for The Washington Examiner and the Mobile Press-Register. Pappas is a graduate of The University of the South in Sewanee, Tenn., where he was editor-in-chief of The Sewanee Purple. While in college, he did internships at NBC's Meet the Press and the White House. He grew up in Mobile, Ala., where he graduated from St. Paul's Episcopal School. He and his wife live on Capitol Hill.

Republican presidential candidate Herman Cain admitted Sunday that “some people” would pay more in taxes every year under his “9-9-9” tax reform plan.

“That’s right. Some people will pay more,” Cain told David Gregory of NBC’s Meet the Press. “But most people will pay less, that’s my argument.”

Cain’s plan throws out the current tax system by establishing a 9 percent corporate tax, a 9 percent income tax and a new 9 percent national sales tax. During a lengthy discussion with Gregory, Cain defended his plan from critics who say the plan will make lower income earners pay more.

Asked by Gregory who will pay more, Cain said, “The people who spend more money on new goods. The sales tax only applies to people who buy new goods, not used goods. That’s a big difference that doesn’t come out.”

Cain took issue though with Gregory saying “the reality of this plan: the wealthiest Americans would pay less, the poorest Americans and middle class would pay more.”

“I do dispute that,” Cain said. “You and others are making assumptions about what wealthy Americans will do with their money and you’re making assumptions about…the middle class and the poor. You can’t predict their behavior.”

“More people will pay less in taxes,” he said.

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