Opinion

The TSA makes airline passengers less safe, not more

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Becky Akers
Freelance Writer
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      Becky Akers

      Becky Akers is a free-lance writer and historian who has published with Barron's, the Christian Science Monitor, the Washington Post, the New York Post, the Independent Review, and many other publications and websites.

And what about the TSA’s compelling us to shuck our shoes and walk on the checkpoints’ filthy floors? Dr. Marybeth Crane is a board-certified foot and ankle surgeon in Texas who asks, “You would never walk barefoot in an airport bathroom, right? … Yet, the bathroom floor probably is cleaner than the carpeting in the security line. The bathroom floor gets cleaned several times a day with disinfectant. The carpeting in security might get vacuumed once or twice a day…” She warns that we risk “warts…herpes … fungus … staph” and even the horrifying MRSA every time we jump barefoot through the TSA’s hoops.

I could continue, pretty much ad infinitum. I haven’t yet discussed the passenger the TSA killed let alone the countless travelers its abuses have chased from the skies to the open road, where accidents claim about 40,000 American lives each year.

The TSA not only threatens our liberty, it threatens our lives. And no wonder: The same government controlling security now controlled it on 9/11. Yes, “private” screeners staffed checkpoints, but every move they made, every item they confiscated, every method and all their technology, even the checkpoints themselves, came straight from the FAA’s playbook. All the TSA did was bring that control into the open.

To truly protect passengers, we need to entrust aviation’s experts, not bureaucrats, with security. Let’s celebrate the TSA’s tenth anniversary by abolishing it.

Becky Akers is a freelance writer and historian whose articles have been published by Barron’s, The Christian Science Monitor, The Washington Post, The New York Post, The Independent Review and many other publications and websites.