Politics
Republican presidential candidate, former House Speaker Newt Gingrich campaigns on primary election day outside of a polling station at Webster School in Manchester, N.H., Tuesday, Jan. 10, 2012. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak) Republican presidential candidate, former House Speaker Newt Gingrich campaigns on primary election day outside of a polling station at Webster School in Manchester, N.H., Tuesday, Jan. 10, 2012. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)  

Pro-Gingrich super PAC aims Michael Moore-style attack ad at Romney

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Jamie Weinstein
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      Jamie Weinstein

      Jamie Weinstein is Senior Editor of The Daily Caller. His work has appeared in The Weekly Standard, the New York Daily News and The Washington Examiner, among many other publications. He also worked as the Collegiate Network Journalism Fellow at Roll Call Newspaper and is the winner of the 2011 "Funniest Celebrity in Washington" contest. A regular on Fox News and other cable news outlets, Weinstein received a master’s degree in the history of international relations from the London School of Economics in 2009 and a bachelor's degree in history and government from Cornell University in 2006. He is the author of the political satire, "The Lizard King: The Shocking Inside Account of Obama's True Intergalactic Ambitions by an Anonymous White House Staffer."

A 28-minute Michael Moore-style attack ad ripping Mitt Romney’s business record will be released Wednesday in South Carolina by a pro-Newt Gingrich super PAC.

The video, obtained by The Daily Caller and other outlets, opens with a montage praising the glories of capitalism, but the music then darkens as the narrator warns how “in the wrong hands” the dreams of Americans can “turn into nightmares.”

“Capitalism made America great. Free markets, innovation, hard work — the building blocks of the American dream,” the narrator bellows. “But in the wrong hands some of those dreams can turn into nightmares.”

Romney, who headed the private equity firm Bain Capital, is depicted as a “privileged son” who ruthlessly sought profits at the expense of workers. The video focuses on four companies acquired by Bain, which it calls some of “Romney’s many targets” — America Pad & Paper, KB Toys, UniMac Corp. and DDI Corp.

Through heart-wrenching interviews with alleged workers and families who suffered as a result of  the job losses that came about after Bain’s acquisition of the companies, the video portrays Romney as “more ruthless than Wall Street.”

“There’s times you skip a meal so your kids can have something to eat,” one alleged Romney victim says in the film before breaking down and crying.

Shortly thereafter, the narrator comments on Romney’s estates.

“Romney had made himself rich beyond imagination,” the narrator says. “He went on to purchase a $3 million home in New Hampshire with a private beach and a $12 million dollar beachfront property in California — even that wasn’t enough.”

The ad then cuts to a clip of liberal MSNBC host Ed Schultz.

“Romney is planning  to bulldoze his $12 million, 3,000 square foot home near San Diego, California and replace it with an 11,000 square foot home instead,” Schultz exclaims.

“And that hurts so bad to leave my home because of one man who has 15 homes,” another alleged victim of Romney’s corporate dealing laments.

The ad is also xenophobic in parts. It mentions twice, for no clear or relevant reason, that Bain had Latin American investors.

“Romney took foreign seed money from Latin America,” the narrator says in one instance.

It also twice shows a video of Romney speaking in French — again for no compelling or relevant purpose.

The film, called “When Mitt Romney Came to Town,” was purchased by pro-Gingrich super PAC Winning Our Future, which is run by former aides of Gingrich, according to Bloomberg News.

Billionaire casino mogul Sheldon Adelson gave $5 million to the super PAC to air the ad, reports Bloomberg.

Jason Killian Meath, who previously worked for the Republican National Committee, according to Bloomberg, produced the film.

Asked by TheDC whether the speaker had any comment on the film or would condemn any part of it, Gingrich campaign spokesman R.C. Hammond replied by email, “Haven’t seen it.”

By law, Super PAC’s must be separate from official political campaigns and can’t coordinate with with them.

South Carolina holds its primary on Jan. 21.

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Matthew Boyle contributed to this report