Politics
Republican presidential candidate Herman Cain discusses taxes while at the American Enterprise Institute in Washington, October 31, 2011. REUTERS/Larry Downing (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS) Republican presidential candidate Herman Cain discusses taxes while at the American Enterprise Institute in Washington, October 31, 2011. REUTERS/Larry Downing (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS)  

Farmer eaten alive by chickens in new Herman Cain ad

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Alex Pappas
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      Alex Pappas

      Alex Pappas is a Washington D.C.-based political reporter for The Daily Caller. He has also written for The Washington Examiner and the Mobile Press-Register. Pappas is a graduate of The University of the South in Sewanee, Tenn., where he was editor-in-chief of The Sewanee Purple. While in college, he did internships at NBC's Meet the Press and the White House. He grew up in Mobile, Ala., where he graduated from St. Paul's Episcopal School. He and his wife live on Capitol Hill.

First it was a goldfish dying on dry land. Then it was a rabbit being shot.

Now, former Republican presidential candidate Herman Cain is drawing attention to his views on throwing out the tax system and starting over with his 9-9-9 plan with a new provocative online video showing a farmer being eaten alive by dozens of chickens.

“This is the average American taxpayer feeding big government,” says the narrator of the ad as a farmer feeds chickens.

Before long, the chickens turn on the farmer and all that’s left of him is a bone.

At the bottom of the YouTube video — obtained by The Daily Caller — reads: “The farmer is fine, but the average American taxpayer isn’t!”

In a recent media call, the former Godfather’s Pizza CEO explained the reasoning for producing such violent ads.

“Because it gets your attention,” Cain said. “That’s why.”

“We live in a 24/7 information overload society and if I went out there with namby-pamby ads to drive home a point, nobody would notice,” he said. “So that’s why. Because it’s intended to be provocative.”

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