The Daily Caller

The Daily Caller
FannyB/playlikeagirl.fr Bacon cheeseburgers with carmelized onions at Le Camion qui Fume, a Parisian gourmet food truck. (Photo from NYTimes Magazine) FannyB/playlikeagirl.fr Bacon cheeseburgers with carmelized onions at Le Camion qui Fume, a Parisian gourmet food truck. (Photo from NYTimes Magazine)  

American food trucks invade Paris

Jordan Feilders, who recently launched the Cantine California taco truck onto the streets of Paris, had a vision from the start that included “stylish visuals, American cupcakes and fresh tortillas,” the New York Times reports.

So far, despite poor perceptions of American food abroad, Feilders’ vision has been well-received.

“We see it on all the police shows on television,” Sophie Juteau told the Times. “Eating from the ice cream trucks, the hot-dog carts: that is, like, our dream.”

Feilders has direct relationships with his suppliers, those who provide him with the certified organic beef and pork for his tacos and organic flour for his cupcakes. The use of “organics” might make you want to roll your eyes, but it’s a successful business venture as organic meat is still rare in France, as told by the New York Times.

Los Angeles native Kristin Frederick, who trained at the School of French Cuisine Ferrandi in Paris, is the founder of the very first food truck in Paris, according to the foodies blog, Paris by Mouth. Le Camion Qui Fume, or The Smoking Truck, is Frederick’s very popular burger truck, which sells combos of beef patties and fries for 10 euros, about $12.50. Customers pay restaurant prices for street food, whose quality is defended by vendors and supporting customers.

“It’s not fast food,” Frederick contends, “But a real gourmet burger with the best quality beef that I select and grind myself and a great cheddar, each burger made à la minute … and for dessert, a super cheesecake,” Food Arts reports.

To the French, the use of some extra fat in their patties is probably a delectable discovery as they nibble or cut into this thing known as the American burger.

“The allure of Paris 75 years ago may have been its thriving arts scene and literary culture, but Americans in Paris today are as likely to be expressing themselves with a whisk as they are a paintbrush or on a keyboard,” the New York Times Style Magazine says.

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