Politics
Charlene Gomez conducts an orientation seminar for illegal immigrants, to determine if they qualify for temporary work permits, at the Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles (CHIRLA), in Los Angeles, Thursday, Sept. 20, 2012. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon) Charlene Gomez conducts an orientation seminar for illegal immigrants, to determine if they qualify for temporary work permits, at the Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles (CHIRLA), in Los Angeles, Thursday, Sept. 20, 2012. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon)  

US importing welfare cases? Just .068 percent of visa applications denied due to dependency risk in FY 2011

Photo of Caroline May
Caroline May
Political Reporter

Last week, the four senators — Utah Republican Sen. Orrin Hatch, Kansas Republican Sen. Pat Roberts, Sen. Sessions and Iowa Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley — sent follow-up letters with an Oct. 1 deadline to both agencies pressing for a complete explanation as to how the watered down approach achieves congressional intent and numbers pertaining to the total number of applications received.

“Indeed, under your interpretation, an able-bodied immigrant of working age could receive the bulk of his or her income in the form of federal welfare and still not be deemed a ‘public charge,’” the four senators wrote in their initial August request for answers.

DHS again missed that deadline Monday, as did the State Department.

The numbers and unresponsiveness have Sessions convinced that DHS and the federal government have something to hide.

“The Department of Homeland Security’s continued refusal to provide the requested information — which is readily accessible to them — demonstrates a desire to cover up their failure to enforce the law,” Sessions told TheDC, going on to add that the nation’s “immigration policy should not be conducted in secret. The American people have a right to know the answers to each and every item in our letters.”

The finding comes as TheDC reported Monday that the USDA has been conducting meetings with the Mexican government to promote food stamp use among Mexican immigrants and that the food stamp enrollment among non-citizens has doubled (reaching an estimated 1.63 million legal non-citizen participants) since President Barack Obama took office.

Participation in the food stamp program is one of the many government benefits that are considered inadmissible when the government reviews entry applications.

“The United States is borrowing huge sums of money from foreign nations to feed, house, clothe and support millions of their citizens now living in the U.S. who were supposed to be able to be able to support themselves,” Sessions added, noting that while Americans are struggling to find work, the government is “granting visas to those who will not only compete for available jobs but who will draw billions in financial assistance from US taxpayers.”

Follow Caroline on Twitter