Elections

              President Barack Obama gestures while speaking at a campaign event at Austin Straubel International Airport in Green Bay, Wis.,Thursday, Nov. 1, 2012. Obama resumed his presidential campaign with travel to key background states of Wisconsin, Colorado, Nevada and Ohio today. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Romney pushes love, hope and change vs. Obama’s revenge

Neil Munro
White House Correspondent

Gov. Mitt Romney is finishing his 2012 race by calling for love, change and hope, while President Barack Obama’s deputies are struggling to explain his call for “revenge.”

Romney and running mate Rep. Paul Ryan are spotlighting Obama’s aggressively partisan call on Nov. 2 to his supporters — “Vote! Voting is the best revenge” — to emphasize their optimistic pitch to swing voters who are burdened by four years of a stalled economy.

Obama “asked his supporters to vote for revenge, for revenge,” Romney said at a rally late Nov. 2. “Instead I ask the American people to vote for love of country,” he said, prompting a roar of applause from the large crowd. (RELATED VIDEO: Obama tells Ohio voters he’s a ‘nice guy’ who is ready to ‘fight’ on their behalf)

The Romney campaign has turned that pitch into end-of-campaign TV commercial, and Ryan is using the same theme to help spur a stronger base turnout.

“In 2008, [Obama] appealed to our highest aspirations. Now, he’s appealing to our lowest fears,” Ryan told a rally on Saturday.

“Mitt Romney and I are asking you to vote out of love for country. … We don’t believe in revenge, we believe in change and hope,” he said, snatching Obama’s signature slogan from 2008.

In fact, Romney is using the “change” slogan so often that word appeared 12 times in his “Real Change from Day One speech.”

“President Obama promised change, but he could not deliver it. I promise change, and I have a record of achieving it. … If you are tired of being tired, then I ask you to vote for real change. Paul Ryan and I will bring real change to America, from Day One,” Romney said Saturday.

Obama’s revenge comment came as he briefly mentioned Romney after discussing former President Bill Clinton’s economic plan. The Democratic crowd booed, and Obama automatically responded, as he has on many other occasions, with a routine riff: “No, no, no — don’t boo, vote!”

This time, however, he quickly added, “Vote! Voting is the best revenge.“