Politics
John Boehner crying next to Nancy Pelosi. AP. John Boehner crying next to Nancy Pelosi. AP.  

Rep. Fleming chides GOP colleagues for caving on taxes

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Matthew Boyle
Investigative Reporter

GOP Sens. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina and Saxby Chambliss of Georgia both publicly said they’d break the pledge too.

“I’m willing to generate revenue,” Graham said on ABC News earlier this week. “It’s fair to ask my party to put revenue on the table. We’re below historic averages.”

“I think Grover is wrong when it comes to, we can’t cap deductions and buy down debt,” Graham added, saying he would “violate the pledge, long story short, for the good of the country.”

Chambliss said in an interview with a local television station that he “care[s] more about my country than I do about a 20-year-old pledge.”

“If we do it his [Norquist’s] way, then we’ll continue in debt, and I just have a disagreement with him about that,” Chambliss said.

Conservative activists have begun to speak out against politicians breaking the pledge.

Conservative activist Phil Kerpen, the president of American Commitment, came out against Graham and Chambliss on Thursday asking them in public letters to honor their pledges.

“Washington, D.C. has a spending problem, not a revenue problem,” Kerpen said in a press statement accompanying the letters. “Senator Chambliss and Senator Graham have an obligation to honor their commitment to taxpayers by opposing all efforts to raise taxes, and seek a balanced budget by stopping reckless federal spending that is harming American families and our economy.”

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