Entertainment

Michael Moore: Americans’ desire to own guns stems from racial fears

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Jeff Poor
Media Reporter

Friday night, on the heels of last week’s mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary in Newtown, Conn., the left-leaning Current TV is planning to air progressive filmmaker Michael Moore’s ten-year-old Columbine documentary “Bowling for Columbine,” with Moore revisiting the film to accuse American gun-owners of being motivated by racial fears.

Gun ownership, Moore said, “cuts down to the heart of our race problem that we still haven’t resolved.”

“I think we’re a very frightened people,” Moore said. “I think we’ve been frightened ever since we landed on these shores. We were frightened of the native people.; we were frightened of the slaves we brought over, as we should have been. And those in power have known how to manipulate us with fear. And we’ve started wars over being told lies about, you know — whether it was in the Spanish-American War, the Mexican-American War. You can go through so many of these wars we’ve been in throughout history — right up through the Iraq War — where we’re just lied to because those in power knew if they just put enough fear out there. And the best kind of fear is the one that has the kernel of truth, so you have 9/11 happened — that’s a real incident, nearly 3,000 people lose their lives. Very easy at that point to use that fact in a way to tell a fiction.”

But according to Moore, it’s that fear that causes Americans want to own gun, which he tied to race by explaining high levels of citizen gun ownership exist “in suburbs and rural areas.”

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“And I was fascinated in that subject when making ‘Bowling for Columbine,’ of how fear is used to the point where everybody feels like they’ve got to have a gun in the house. Now, not every house has a gun but we’ve got over a quarter-billion guns in people’s homes. And they’re mostly in the suburbs and rural areas where there is virtually no crime and no murder. So why is that? What are they really afraid of? What do they think of — who’s going to break into the house? Do they think it’s little freckled-face Jimmy down the street? I don’t think so. I don’t think that’s who they’re afraid of. And it cuts down to the heart of our race problem that we still haven’t resolved. And I thought it would be interesting to take a look at that in the movie.”

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