The Daily Caller

The Daily Caller
Karl Marx. Photo - public domain Karl Marx. Photo - public domain  

OPINION: Outlandish college courses: the public-school Dirty Dozen

College of William & Mary, Economics: Government Regulation of Business

An analysis of the principles and purposes of government regulation of business. Topics include energy policy, consumer and worker protection, transportation, telecommunications and public utilities.

College of William & Mary, Government: The American Welfare State

The politics of U.S. social policy in historical perspective. Topics vary by year but usually include retirement pensions, health care, and programs for the poor.

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Government: Paying for Green Government: Financing and Implementing Sustainability Initiatives

This course is designed to provide an in-depth introduction to planning and funding greener government operations. The Environmental Finance Center will lead a participatory workshop that focuses on the finance and policy challenges that arise when local governments consider implementing energy efficiency, green building, fuel efficiency, waste reduction, alternative energy projects, and other sustainability initiatives. Participants will learn how to select green projects for their community; what basic finance tools are available for green projects; how to leverage third-party equity to take advantage of tax credits; and how to apply for guaranteed energy savings contracts. The course will also cover relevant information on how to apply federal stimulus money to greener government.

Penn State University, Women’s Studies: Racism and Sexism

This course focuses on racism and sexism through a critical analysis of race and gender equality/inequality. A primary objective of this course is to provide students with information and conceptual tools necessary for understanding the structure and composition of race and gender inequality in the United States today. The focus on both racism and sexism provides a perspective that is quite different from those of courses that deal with race or sex alone. Racism and sexism have much in common that suggests their combined study. The course examines the way in which these processes are socially constructed and defined and how these constructions and definitions are experienced in daily life at an individual level and societal level. The course also examines how social control dependent on power, privilege, and advantage continues to perpetuate sexism and racism.