Education
Karl Marx. Photo - public domain Karl Marx. Photo - public domain  

OPINION: Outlandish college courses: the public-school Dirty Dozen

University of Michigan, Women’s Studies: Latina Women in the U.S.

Who are Latina women? What makes them unique? What commonalities and differences do they have with women of other backgrounds and with Latino and other men? This course is an exploration of Latina women’s experiences in the United States. We will focus especially on Chicana, Nuyorican/Puerto Rican, Cuban American, and Dominican American texts, with some discussions of Central American and South American issues. The class has a comparative race and ethnic studies framework and significantly addresses issues of racism. We also read and view contributions by lesbian and bisexual women, and discuss issues of sex, gender, sexuality, misogyny, and homophobia. Class materials will include historiographic and expository essays, novels, films, and autobiographical/ethnographic writing

University of California, Los Angeles, LGBT Studies: Queer Arts in Los Angeles

This course will introduce students to the wide gamut of queer arts in Los Angeles, including photography, painting, posters, films and performance art. There will be a special focus on queer Latina/o artists, AIDS art, and censorship. Attendance at a queer art exhibition or performance will be required. Students will learn the technology necessary to create a collaborative class website on Queer Arts in L.A. Employing website-building technology will teach students to research, select, synthesize, and visually represent the information necessary to introduce a general public to the work and contributions of queer artists in Los Angeles.

University of Washington, Sociology: Who Gets Ahead? Public Schooling in America

Addresses fundamental questions about the relationship between education and society. Examines why some students learn more and advance further than others; what factors shape how schools are run/organized and which materials are taught; how race/class/gender affect students within schools; how schools maintain our economic system and can become more effective.

University of Washington, Environmental Studies: Environmental Justice

Examines introductory studies of environmental racism and ecological injustice in the United States and select areas of the world. Reviews environmental justice theories and methods applied to risk science, ecosystem management, biodiversity conservation, and sustainable development. Includes comparative studies of social movements for “eco-justice.”