Opinion

Abortion and the live-and-let-live ethic

Photo of David Christensen
David Christensen
Director of Congressional Affairs, Family Research Council

Planned Parenthood and others argue they don’t want politicians making choices for women as it relates to their pregnancies. The Buzzfeed article I mentioned earlier quotes Cecile Richards, the president of Planned Parenthood, saying, “It is important that women make their own decisions about pregnancy, and that politicians do not.” Really? Richards is quite happy to have politicians force Americans to fund over $2 billion a year in family planning and contraception services (through Title X and Medicaid). Planned Parenthood received $543 million of government funding in 2011, according to its latest annual report, and it spent $15 million to re-elect President Obama. Pro-choicers supported government funding of elective abortion under Obamacare, and even an abortion fee in health plans that cover it. Planned Parenthood and other pro-choicers have supported the Obamacare mandate, which forces employers — including religious hospitals, educational institutions and charities — to provide their employees with insurance that covers contraceptives and abortion-causing drugs. Americans need to be reminded of the ways pro-choice groups have successfully inserted taxpayers into the bedrooms of American women.

The good news is that Gallup polling shows for the first time that 50 percent of Americans consider themselves pro-life. The number of “pro-choice” Americans has dropped. Maybe that explains Planned Parenthood’s new marketing efforts.

As we approach the 40th commemoration of Roe v. Wade and the March for Life, Americans need to ask themselves if we should “live and let live” or “live and let kill.”

David Christensen is the director of congressional affairs at the Family Research Council.