Politics

              FILE - This Dec. 28, 2012 file photo shows President Barack Obama speaking to reporters in the Brady Press Briefing Room at the White House in Washington. Republican leaders scramble for votes on a stopgap debt-limit measure that would let the government keep borrowing until at least mid-May, giving up for now on trying to win spending cuts from Democrats in return. But the respite would be only temporary, with major battles still to come between the GOP and President Barack Obama over taxes, spending and deficits. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File)

Obama’s touts abortion rights, child safety to win women’s votes

Neil Munro
White House Correspondent

Obama is also trying to win women’s votes via his focus on “gun safety.”

Voters should confront legislators, he said Jan. 16, and “ask them what’s more important — doing whatever it takes to get an A grade from the gun lobby that funds their campaigns, or giving parents some peace of mind when they drop their child off for first grade?”

That language suggests that the president is using his opposition to guns and support for abortion to woo swing-voting, suburban mothers.

“The political maneuvering of the president [is intended] to win more more votes by playing off the fear of Americans,” said Rose. “Women deserve better,” she added.

Obama should be trying to protect humans before and after their birth, said Rose. “Logic and science tells us they’re both children … we should be protecting the child in the wombs just as when they are five, six or seven,“ she said.

Since the 1973 Roe v. Wade decision, the Supreme Court has loosened its restrictions on legislators and voters.

For example, the 1994 court decision Planned Parenthood v. Casey allowed some curbs on late-term abortions.

The 1994 decision barred any regulation or legislation that puts “undue burden” on a woman’s ability to have an abortion. The “undue burden” was loosely defined by the court as “a state regulation [which] has the purpose or effect of placing a substantial obstacle in the path of a woman seeking an abortion of a nonviable fetus.”

More than 13 states have curbs on late-term abortions, but the courts require exemptions for when a woman’s life is in danger, and in cases when the woman’s physical or mental health are deemed in danger.

The president’s focus on private health-care decisions also clashes with his support of the Obamacare law, which gives the federal government unprecedented power to shape each American’s medical care.

But today, Obama’s statement declared that the White House stands by Roe’s “guiding principle: that government should not intrude on our most private family matters, and women should be able to make their own choices about their bodies and their health care.”

A Wall Street Journal/NBC News poll released Jan 22 reported that only 31 percent of Americans believe that abortion should be legal under all circumstances. (RELATED: Most Americans support keeping abortion legal)

The poll also showed that 23 percent believe that it should be legal in most cases, and 35 percent believe it should be illegal with exceptions.

Nine percent believe it should be illegal without exceptions.

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