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              FILE - In this Jan. 21, 2013, photo, Vice President Joe Biden reacts with his wife, Jill, as they walk down Pennsylvania Avenue en route to the White House, Monday, Jan. 21, 2013, in Washington, during the Inaugural Parade during the 57th Presidential Inauguration parade after the ceremonial swearing-in of President Barack Obama. Biden in 2016? The inauguration is barely over but the vice president already is dropping plenty of hints that he might have another political act. Biden packed his schedule with events and receptions attended by party stalwarts throughout the long weekend of inauguration festivities, stoking speculation he may be laying the groundwork to carry the torch from Obama.  (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

Biden’s Secret Service blamed for disrupting business during Mardi Gras

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Alex Pappas
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      Alex Pappas

      Alex Pappas is a Washington D.C.-based political reporter for The Daily Caller. He has also written for The Washington Examiner and the Mobile Press-Register. Pappas is a graduate of The University of the South in Sewanee, Tenn., where he was editor-in-chief of The Sewanee Purple. While in college, he did internships at NBC's Meet the Press and the White House. He grew up in Mobile, Ala., where he graduated from St. Paul's Episcopal School. He and his wife live on Capitol Hill.

The first weekend of Mardi Gras in New Orleans is always a lucrative one for local businesses, especially for those located in the historic French Quarter neighborhood.

But when the carnival season kicked off last weekend in southern Louisiana, one business failed to bring in the expected cash from the influx of revelers. That business, a parking garage company, says the blame lies with Vice President Joe Biden and the Secret Service agents who were protecting him Saturday during a visit to the city.

“It was a big loss over the weekend,” Sterling Chauvin, the chief operating officer of the Premium Parking Service, explained in an interview with The Daily Caller.

While parades were rolling Saturday evening, Biden happened to be attending a fundraiser for Democratic Sen. Mary Landrieu at the Ritz Carlton in the French Quarter. Adding to the chaos that day was a freak accident – a Secret Service dog fell to its death from the parking garage Chauvin operates – that made national news.

But what has Chauvin, his co-workers and the owner of the parking garage still steaming is how Secret Service agents unexpectedly showed up that evening and closed off an entrance to the garage as they secured the area around the Biden fundraiser. They believe, he said, that they lost customers because of the decision.

“They blocked off everything around the building,” Chauvin recalled. “The streets. Everything. And this on a Saturday in the middle of parades.” (RELATED: Bloomberg praises Biden’s tough stance on gun control)

“We had no idea that the vice president and Sen. Landrieu were coming,” he continued. “We had no idea they were going to take possession of the top floor of my building and run armed officers up and down the ramps without letting us know. We got no warning.”

On Monday, Chauvin wouldn’t reveal exactly how much money he thinks the company lost, but said it “[made a] lot less than last year.”

“We looked at the numbers today and Jim, who is my owner, is not going to be happy,” he said, explaining that they had been charging drivers $20 and $30 a car to park that night.

Max Milien, a spokesman for the Secret Service, told TheDC on Tuesday that while agents blocked one of the two entrances to the parking garage for security reasons, the parking garage remained open during the Biden fundraiser.

“We did not close any parking garages,” he said in a phone interview.

Added Milien: “We make every attempt during the advance process and even during the day of the events to minimize disruptions and to advise businesses and owners what to expect ahead of time.”

But according to Chauvin, the agents who showed up to the garage in at least three cars that day refused to explain why they were there. One agent repeatedly told Chauvin to back away when he tried to ask questions about what was going on, he said.

“All I was trying to do was find out how long they were going to be up there, what I needed to tell my valets, so we could conduct business,” he said.