Politics
Ashley Judd at a football game. AP/David J. Phillip. Ashley Judd at a football game. AP/David J. Phillip.  

Ashley Judd’s biggest problem: Her history of bizarre comments

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Alex Pappas
Political Reporter
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      Alex Pappas

      Alex Pappas is a Washington D.C.-based political reporter for The Daily Caller. He has also written for The Washington Examiner and the Mobile Press-Register. Pappas is a graduate of The University of the South in Sewanee, Tenn., where he was editor-in-chief of The Sewanee Purple. While in college, he did internships at NBC's Meet the Press and the White House. He grew up in Mobile, Ala., where he graduated from St. Paul's Episcopal School. He and his wife live on Capitol Hill.

But Democrats appear to be nervous about a run.

“If she runs, I think that it would be a catastrophe for a lot of downballot races in Kentucky,” Jimmy Cauley, a Democratic strategist in Kentucky, told Roll Call recently.

Likewise, political observers are doubtful of a Judd candidacy.

“In fact, in a midterm election during President Barack Obama’s second term, Ashley Judd would have about the same chance of getting elected to the Senate in Kentucky as Rep. Todd Akin, R-Mo., would have of being elected president of EMILY’s List,” Stuart Rothenberg of the Rothenberg Political Report wrote in November.

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