KausFiles

Coulter blasts amnesty at CPAC

Maybe it’s not that courageous to defy the near-perfect Elite Media Consensus favoring “comprehensive immigration reform”–i.e. amnesty. But it takes balls to do it a) at a conservative conference rigged to push amnesty; b) if you value your relationship with amnesty-supporting FOX News; and c) if you ridicule Roger Ailes’ old patrons, the Bushes, in the process. …The Coulter video is here on Politico. … Don’t expect it to be featured on Fox! … P.S.: Hmm. I can’t find it on Daily Caller either. It’s lucky I’m not paranoid. … P.P.S.: If you want a policy, as opposed to political, argument against amnesty, stick around for Coulter’s explanation (at about 15:30 mark) of  Mitt Romney’s non-trivial–and therefore shockingly strong–support (20%) among young black men:  “They want jobs and they don’t want to be competing with illegal aliens for jobs. … I think we owe them something more than someone who has just run across the border.” Over to you Matt Yglesias. …

Backfill: A newly released movie, The Girl, effectively puts human faces on those who do run across the border. I recommend seeing it (though you’d better act fast–there were only three people in the theater when I went). But if The Girl is supposed to be a pro-amnesty film, it’s decidedly off message in two respects: 1) It portrays an entire culture and infrastructure in Mexico dedicated to smuggling vast numbers of striving undocumented workers across the border, when today’s Amnesty Party Line is ‘Don’t worry, that’s all stopped now;‘ ** and 2) it depicts the border as highly porous, when the A.P.L. is ’the border is secure.’ … I should add that it also depicts the province (I think Oaxaca) from which its protagonists come as a rustic paradise out of a Pottery Barn catalog. But you could still understand why its residents might want to quadruple their earning power by working in the U.S. …

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**–AP’s Hope Yen also must have missed the memo about permanently declining immigration.  She writes of

the modern wave of U.S. newcomers from Latin America and Asia. Their annual inflow of 650,000 people since 1965, at a rate that’s grown in recent years …