Opinion

Obama the Shameless

Photo of Yates Walker
Yates Walker
Conservative Activist
  • See All Articles
  • Subscribe to RSS
  • Follow on Twitter
  • Bio

      Yates Walker

      Yates Walker is a conservative activist and writer. He began his work in politics with Americans for Limited Government in 2009. As an activist, Yates helped organize Tea Parties in four congressional districts to oppose Obamacare, and he ultimately helped unseat three Democrat congressmen in 2010. He has worked in various capacities in campaigns in eight states in his effort to advance conservative causes and candidates. Yates served honorably as a paratrooper and a medic in the U.S. Army's 82nd Airborne Division. He is also a contributing writer to BigPeace.com and TheMinorityReportBlog.com. He can be reached at yateswalker@gmail.com.

A national conversation about shame will be devastating to the Obama administration. Over 5 million future Americans have been aborted during Obama’s tenure. And the president is on pace to nearly double a debt so large that it threatens our national security. Of course, Obama’s apologists will say that Bush and Republicans-past have done the same thing. And they’ll be right. But so what? Americans aren’t going to blame themselves. And Obama has been in the Oval Office for more than four years.

The great thing about shame — especially in America — is that it creates an opportunity for redemption.

Democrats and Republicans alike love their children and want to pass a better America onto them. Americans on both sides of the aisle are proud of our nation’s history of generosity and personal sacrifice. No one in the GOP is speaking in those terms. They’re afraid to talk about entitlement reform. But, with Obama’s help, they won’t have to. They can talk about the shame that is our federal spending. Then they can offer a solution.

GOP critics are presently insisting that the GOP needs fundamental change to appeal to new voters. They’re wrong. It’s all about messaging. It’s always about messaging. Would Obama have won in 2008 if he said that he was going to abandon Clinton’s landmark welfare reform, extend food stamps to one-seventh of our citizenry, take over a sixth of our economy, fold on gay marriage, leave embassies undefended, abandon all of the progress our soldiers fought for in Iraq, legalize untried, indefinite detention of American citizens, and add $10 trillion to the national debt — all the while, partying with celebrities in Hollywood, inciting class warfare, and soaking the rich?

No. He would’ve soared like Dukakis. Obama won on messaging. Democrats always do. But Barack just fumbled on a major play.

Republicans can learn from Alinsky. Someone in leadership on the right needs to engage Obama in a national conversation about shame, redirecting the shame from gun control to spending and the willful mortgaging of America’s future. Whenever Obama mentions new spending, he needs to hear a shame chorus from the right concerning shattered piggy banks and America’s beleaguered future generations. The shame angle needs to be harped on until it gets a response from the president. Eventually Obama will be forced to address the argument. When he does, specific cuts should be demanded. If he makes the requested cuts, new cuts should be demanded. When he fails, the shame chorus should begin anew.

Adding his perilous spending and absentee budgeting over the last four years to his recent words, President Obama has given Republicans a golden opportunity to reshape the political zeitgeist. Unlike most Republican arguments, this one is bite-sized, populist, and winning: Stop robbing America’s children. A brighter, less indebted American future polls well with students, parents, seniors, veterans, whites, blacks, Asians, Hispanics, and everyone else.

From FDR to JFK, presidents in the Democratic pantheon have promoted the idea of shared sacrifice for the good of the collective. Obama doesn’t. If anything, Obama promotes shared plunder. Republicans have an opening to steal a long-winning Democratic talking point. Americans may not like entitlement cuts, but they do love sacrificing for a noble cause. All an enterprising Republican needs to do is ask.

Paul? Marco? Rand?

Yates Walker is a conservative activist and writer. Before becoming involved in politics, he served honorably as a paratrooper and a medic in the U.S. Army’s 82nd Airborne Division. He can be reached at yateswalker@gmail.com.