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Ann Coulter
Political Commentator

Scratch any claim that Lott’s research has been “debunked” and you will find Donohue, his co-author and plagiarist Ian Ayres, or one of the three “scholars” mentioned above — the ones so committed to a search for the truth that they refused to return Lott’s data to him. (Imagine the consequences if Lott had been forced to admit to plagiarism, as Ayres has.)

Donohue’s previous oeuvre includes the racist claim that the crime rate declined in the 1990s as a result of abortion being legalized in the ’70s. (Nearly 40 percent of the abortions since the 1973 case of Roe v. Wade were of black children.)

This study was discredited (not “discredited”) by many economists, including two at the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, who pointed out that Donohue’s study made critical mistakes, such as failing to control for variables such as the crack cocaine epidemic. When the Reserve economists reran Donohue’s study without his glaring mistakes, they found that there was “no evidence in (Donohue’s) own data” for an abortion-crime link.

Curiously, the failure to account for the crack epidemic is one of Donohue’s complaints with Lott’s study. It worked so well against his own research he thought he’d try it against Lott. The difference is: Lott has, in fact, accounted for the crack epidemic, over and over again, in multiple regressions, all set forth in his book.

Donohue and plagiarist Ayres took a nasty swipe at Lott in the Stanford Law Review so insane that the editors of the Review — Donohue’s own students — felt compelled to issue a subsequent “clarification” saying: “Ayres and Donohue’s Reply piece is incorrect, unfortunate, and unwarranted.”

When you have to be corrected on your basic anti-gun facts by an ABC correspondent — as Donohue was by “Nightline” correspondent John Donvan in a 2008 televised panel discussion — you might be a few shakes away from a disinterested scholar.

But the easily fooled New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof has repeatedly called Lott “discredited,” based on a 2003 article by charlatans Donohue and Ayres — a non-peer-reviewed law review article. In a 2011 column, for example, Kristof dismissed Lott’s book, “More Guns, Less Crime,” with the bald assertion that “many studies have now debunked that finding.”

The details of the chicanery of Donohue, plagiarist Ayres, as well as all of Lott’s other critics, are dealt with point by point in the third edition of Lott’s “More Guns, Less Crime,” and in a number of published articles by Lott and others, you can see how his critics cherry-picked the data, made basic statistical errors, tried every regression analysis imaginable to get the results they want and lied about Lott’s work (such as Donohue’s claim that he neglected to account for the crack epidemic).

Suffice it to say that of the 177 separate analyses run by all these critics, only seven show a statistically significant increase in crime after the passage of concealed-carry laws, while 90 of their own results show a statistically significant drop in crime — and 80 show no difference.

“Discredited” in liberal lingo means, “Ignore this study; it didn’t come out well for us.”

Ann Coulter is an author and political commentator.