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A child looks at a witch puppet on April 30, 2013 in Havraniky, 70km southwest from Brno, during a traditional Celtic spring Walpurgis night celebrations. Walpurgis Night (Burning is a traditional spring festival on 30 April or 1 May in large parts of Central and Northern Europe. AFP PHOTO /  RADEK MICA        (Photo credit should read RADEK MICA/AFP/Getty Images) A child looks at a witch puppet on April 30, 2013 in Havraniky, 70km southwest from Brno, during a traditional Celtic spring Walpurgis night celebrations. Walpurgis Night (Burning is a traditional spring festival on 30 April or 1 May in large parts of Central and Northern Europe. AFP PHOTO / RADEK MICA (Photo credit should read RADEK MICA/AFP/Getty Images)  

African country prohibits witches from flying higher than 150 meters

In the country of Swaziland, witches are no longer allowed to fly higher than 150 meters in the air, lest they be subject to arrest and heavy fines.

According to a report by the Civil Aviation Authority, broomsticks are considered similar to heavier-than-air transportation devices, and therefore are subject to this regulation.

“A witch on a broomstick should not fly above the [150-metre] limit,” Civil Aviation Authority marketing and corporate affairs director Sabelo Dlamini said.

The rule also applies to toy helicopters and kites to forbid them from flying too high into the sky.

The people of Swaziland take witches seriously, as many of them believe in witchcraft.

Recently, a private detective was arrested for operating a remote-control helicopter. The detective’s helicopter was equipped with video surveillance technology to gather information in a manner similar to the way drones operate.

The man was ”charged with operating an unregistered aircraft and for failing to appear before his chief to be questioned by traditional authorities about his toy drone, the first of its kind in Swaziland,” AfricanSpotlight.com notes.

This arrest prompted Dlamini to explain in further detail the country’s aviation policies.

“Swazi brooms are short bundles of sticks tied together and do not have handles. Swazi witches are known to use them to fling potions about homesteads — but not for transport,”  AfricanSpotlight.com says.

Witches on broomsticks flying below 150 meters remain legal.

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