Business
Magpul advertising photo by Teddy Smith. Magpul advertising photo by Teddy Smith.  

Magpul joins gun control lawsuit against Colorado

Greg Campbell
Contributor

Magpul Industries has joined a lawsuit filed in federal court Friday against the state of Colorado, hoping to overturn strict new gun control laws that have caused the magazine manufacturer to begin the process of moving out of state.

But regardless of the ultimate outcome of the suit, the company is still leaving Colorado.

“While Magpul is currently in the process of moving its operations out of Colorado, we will not turn our back on our native state,” said Duane Liptak, the company’s director of product management and marketing, in a statement posted on Magpul’s Facebook page. “Extreme gun control interests have forced the passage of these unconstitutional laws in Colorado, and as a company, we are resolved to restore those rights to the people.”

Magpul is one of almost two dozen plaintiffs in the suit, which is spearheaded by a group of 54 of the state’s 62 elected county sheriffs.

It targets two of Colorado’s five new gun control laws — one that requires background checks for all gun transfers and another that outlaws magazines that can hold more than 15 rounds of ammunition.

Among its products, Magpul makes 30-round magazines for military, law enforcement and private customers.

At a press conference on Friday, the sheriffs called the new laws unconstitutional and unenforceable — sentiments echoed by Magpul.

“Colorado’s gun control laws are in direct conflict with the U.S. Constitution,” the company’s lawyer, Jon Anderson, says in the statement. “In addition, these bills were so poorly drafted that no one agrees on the scope of the government regulation. If teams of lawyers cannot agree on what these bills prohibit, how can we expect citizens to abide by these laws and how can we rely on law enforcement to implement these laws in a consistent manner?”

In another posting, Magpul said the suit could have national implications, which helped drive the company’s decision to get involved.

“If this suit can get a mag ban struck down as unconstitutional, the nation may see a ripple effect across other states who choose not to trust their citizens with their natural rights,” the company wrote. “That makes this fight worth fighting even more than just the implications for CO, which would have been enough to get us involved.”

Still, the company is moving forward with its plans to relocate.

“That train has left the station,” Magpul wrote.