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Gallup: ‘Managers from hell’ cost US between $450 billion to $550 billion annually

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Caroline May
Political Reporter

Uninspired to get out of bed and go to work this morning? You were not the only one.

A Gallup study of the American workforce has found that just 30 percent of the American workforce is “engaged and inspired” at work, with the other 70 percent either disengaged or miserable.

Gallup’s “2013 State of the American Workplace” report released this month found that some 30 percent of American workers were “engaged” which Gallup defines as “employees who are involved in, enthusiastic about, and committed to their work and contribute to their organization in a positive manner.”

On the other hand 52 percent of American workers are “not engaged” and another 18 percent “actively disengaged,” that 18 percent Gallup estimates costs America between $450 billion to $550 billion a year in lost productivity.

Actively disengaged “employees aren’t just unhappy at work; they’re busy acting out their unhappiness,” Gallup’s report explains. “Every day, these workers undermine what their engaged coworkers accomplish. Gallup adds that managers are the ones most responsible for employee’s engagement levels.”

Gallup adds that managers are the ones most responsible for employee’s engagement levels.

“Organizations should coach managers to take an active role in building engagement plans with their employees, hold managers accountable, track their progress, and ensure they continuously focus on emotionally engaging their employees,” the report reads.

In his analysis of the data, Gallup Chairman and CEO Jim Clifton chalked the disengagement levels to poor managers.

“Gallup research also shows that these managers from hell are creating active disengagement costing the U.S. an estimated $450 billion to $550 billion annually. If your company reflects the average in the U.S., just imagine what poor management and disengagement are costing your bottom line,” Clifton wrote.

“When leaders in the United States of America — or any country for that matter — wake up one morning and say collectively, “Let’s get rid of managers from hell, double the number of great managers and engaged employees, and have those managers lead based on what actually matters,” everything will change,” he added. “The country’s employees will be twice as effective, they’ll create far more customers, companies will grow, spiraling healthcare costs will decrease, and desperately needed GDP will boom like never before.”

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