The Daily Caller

The Daily Caller
              A Vietnamese man uses a laptop to go online by a 3G device inserted into a USB pot at a cafe in Ha Noi, Viet Nam on Wednesday, May 14, 2013. Close to a third of Vietnam’s 90 million people are online and men and women browsing phones and tablets are ubiquitous in the cafes of its towns and cities. The country’s potential for growth, young population and good Internet infrastructure have made it an attractive destination for regional and international investors and startups in content provision, e-payment and other services. (AP Photo/Na Son Nguyen).

Internet sales taxes are no way to court younger voters

John Tate
President, Campaign for Liberty

If the GOP is to regain majority party status, it must earn the loyalty of Internet-savvy young people, especially the young activists who fueled the “Ron Paul r3VOLution” and are continuing to make the liberty moment a major force in American politics. One issue these young voters care most about is keeping the Internet free of taxes and regulations.

This should be a no-brainer for the GOP, since defending the Internet from big government is consistent with the GOP’s professed support for limited government, free markets, and individual liberty. Sadly, too many in the GOP are unwilling to consistently apply their principles to the Internet, thus once again making the party look hypocritical and out-of-touch to young voters.

In the last Congress, for example, many Republicans chose to side with large, entrenched corporate interests by supporting the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA). SOPA would have given the federal government the authority to shut down an entire website based on a single complaint of copyright infringement by one of the site’s users. This might have benefitted bureaucrats, politicians, and their corporate backers, but it would have harmed the young people who made Facebook and YouTube into household names. SOPA was defeated after several Internet companies organized a “black out the Internet day” to protest. Young activists supported the blackout day in droves.

One might think the SOPA experience would have taught the GOP young voters want government’s hands off the Internet. Sadly, while elephants may never forget, they sometimes fail to learn. Republicans followed up SOPA with the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (CISPA), which gives the federal government new powers to spy on us when we use it. Like SOPA, CISPA has energized young activists against the bill and against the politicians of both parties who support it.

Earlier this year, many Senate Republicans once again opposed Internet freedom when they voted for the so-called “Marketplace Fairness Act,” more aptly named the National Internet Tax Mandate. The National Internet Tax Mandate is the perfect bill for the GOP — if it wants to continue repelling younger voters.

The National Internet Tax Mandate allows state governments to force out-of-state retailers to collect sales taxes on Internet purchases, thus raising the price of every product we buy online.

Large, established businesses, such as Wal-Mart, Target, and Amazon.com, are lobbying hard for this bill. These businesses want the government to cripple their smaller online competitors with new regulations. The new costs and burdens this bill imposes will make it considerably more difficult for young people to use the Internet to grow their existing businesses, much less to create new Internet-based startups. At a time when young people have been hit especially hard by the economic downturn, why should they support politicians who vote to destroy their best path to economic prosperity?