Education
Photo (left to right): Getty Images, public domain Photo (left to right): Getty Images, public domain  

Public school kids no longer forced to kneel before principal

Article I of the United States Constitution forbids any grant of nobility in the United States. Sadly, Dana Carter, the very important new principal of Calimesa Elementary School in Southern California’s Inland Empire, failed to get the memo about the 226-year-old document.

An already-changed policy instituted at Calimesa Elementary for the start of the school year had forced students to kneel down in front of Carter — and potentially other administrators– before being sent to class, reports CBS Los Angeles.

School officials described the bizarre kneeling policy as a postive effort to protect students. During its brief life, the policy was most frequently implemented at the official beginning of each class day and right after recess.

Several parents didn’t love the procedure. A flyer opposing the policy circulated among offended moms and dads.

One parent, the mother of a seven-year-old girl at the school, spoke to CBS Los Angeles.

“She says that she has to drop down on one knee with her hands at her side, wait for the principal to come out, lift his arms and tell them to go to class,” the unidentified mother told the station.

“I feel that the principal wants to be like a king, and we don’t have kings in America,” she added.

Not long after CBS Los Angeles initially broke the story, Cali Binks, the local school district superintendent, announced that the controversial kneeling policy would be immediately eliminated.

The school district notified parents of the change by mass phone calls.

It is completely unclear what threatens the Calimesa Elementary campus to such an extent that the principal wanted to demand that students kneel before him before school and after recess.

Principal Carter has apparently deigned to schedule a meeting with parents to design future safety options for the school.

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