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              FILE - In this Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2013 file photo, French President Francois Hollande delivers his speech at the European Parliament in Strasbourg, eastern France. On Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2013, European Union lawmakers voted overwhelmingly to meet only in Brussels and avoid costly monthly treks to Strasbourg, France, even though such a move faces a French veto. The 766 EU legislators have two main offices and shuttle their staffs for meetings of the full Parliament in Strasbourg, a practice that comes from the beginnings of the bloc when France and Germany sought an emblem for their postwar reconciliation. (AP Photo/Christian Lutz, File)
              FILE - In this Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2013 file photo, French President Francois Hollande delivers his speech at the European Parliament in Strasbourg, eastern France. On Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2013, European Union lawmakers voted overwhelmingly to meet only in Brussels and avoid costly monthly treks to Strasbourg, France, even though such a move faces a French veto. The 766 EU legislators have two main offices and shuttle their staffs for meetings of the full Parliament in Strasbourg, a practice that comes from the beginnings of the bloc when France and Germany sought an emblem for their postwar reconciliation. (AP Photo/Christian Lutz, File)   

European Parliament rejects report calling for educating infants about masturbation, sexual left flabbergasted

Photo of Wendy Wright and Rebecca Oas
Wendy Wright and Rebecca Oas
VP, Associate Director of Research, C-FAM
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      Wendy Wright and Rebecca Oas

      Wendy Wright is Vice President for Government Relations and Communications for C-FAM, a human rights group focused on the UN and other international institutions. Ms. Wright was named among "The 100 Most Powerful Women of Washington" by Washingtonian magazine in 2006. A pro-life advocate and former president of Concerned Women for America, she has briefed international and congressional leaders, testified in Congress and state legislatures and trained grassroots organizations and advocates. Her activism influenced landmark rulings on freedom of speech in the U.S. Supreme Court and several U.S. state courts.

      Ms. Wright has appeared in every major news outlet, including FOXNews, CNN, PBS, BBC, NPR, Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, Atlanta Journal and Constitution,World magazine, Christianity Today, ABC, CBS, NBC, and MSNBC.

      Rebecca Oas is the Associate Director of Research for the Catholic Family and Human Rights Institute (C-FAM) in New York City. Rebecca earned her doctorate in Genetics and Molecular Biology at Emory University. She has written for Human Life International as a Fellow of HLI America. She is a graduate of Michigan State University.

MEP Edite Estrela exploded in anger on the floor of the European Parliament last week. Her fellow Parliamentarians had just rejected – again – a report, named after her, declaring abortion a human right and calling for sex ed that teaches newborns about masturbation.

They were guilty of “hypocrisy and obscurantism” charged Estrela, a Socialist from Portugal.

“I’m not afraid of you!” she shouted. “I know I’m right!”

A few weeks before, the same report set off a fiery exchange in the Parliament. Some complained the lengthy document was afforded only five minutes to discuss, adding to suspicions that the intent was to slip it through without scrutiny.

The Estrela report called for abortion with no restrictions, compulsory sex education in mixed-sex settings beginning with newborns, and assisted medical procreation for lesbian couples. Countries are to eliminate parental involvement laws, require health providers commit abortions, guarantee funding to groups dispensing sexual and reproductive health services, and provide abortions to non-residents. Countries must ensure children can be given – and give out – information on sexuality, sexual orientation and gender identity.

The sex education curriculum recommended was “Standards for Sexuality Education” by the World Health Organization. Its guidelines begin with:

Ages 0 – 4 years, “Give information about enjoyment and pleasure when touching one’s body, early childhood masturbation,” and “Give the right to explore gender identities.”

Ages 4 – 6 years, “give information about same-sex relationships,” and “Help children develop respect for different norms regarding sexuality.”

One abortion activist said the Estrela report would “advance sexual and reproductive health and rights – not only for Europe but on a broader international level!”

The phrase “sexual and reproductive health” has been a source of controversy for twenty years. The term was introduced in a UN document at a 1994 conference in Cairo. At the time, the Clinton administration ignited a worldwide brouhaha when they first vowed to create an international right to abortion through the Cairo meeting, then backed off after a massive push-back inspired by Pope John Paul II.

What does it mean? Many countries went out of their way to enter into the record that, for them, it does not include abortion. No government said it did.

Since then, abortion advocates – inside and outside governments – have conducted an unrelenting, by-hook-or-by-crook campaign to get what they couldn’t at Cairo. One tactic is to simply redefine the phrase to mean whatever they choose.

A few years ago, the newly-minted Secretary of State Hillary Clinton shocked a congressional committee. She was not naïve to the roiling history and delicate negotiations to gain UN approval of the phrase – she was deeply engaged in them as First Lady.

Nevertheless, she stated – like an article of faith – that she believes it includes abortion. It was a bull-in-a-china-shop moment, challenging the carefully constructed agreement among nations.