The Daily Caller

The Daily Caller

HOWLEY: de Blasio daughter’s drug abuse video is what’s wrong with young America

New York mayoral candidate Bill de Blasio embraces his daughter Chiara during a campaign rally in Brooklyn, New York September 7, 2013.  Mayor Michael Bloomberg said the Democratic front-runner to succeed him as mayor is waging a "class warfare and racist" campaign, according to an interview published on New York Magazine New York mayoral candidate Bill de Blasio embraces his daughter Chiara during a campaign rally in Brooklyn, New York September 7, 2013. Mayor Michael Bloomberg said the Democratic front-runner to succeed him as mayor is waging a "class warfare and racist" campaign, according to an interview published on New York Magazine's website on Saturday. Bill de Blasio, the city's public advocate who has built his campaign around rising economic inequality, has been surging in public polls, overtaking the race's longtime front-runner, City Council Speaker Christine Quinn, a Bloomberg ally. REUTERS/Darren Ornitz (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS) - RTX13C3A  

Having a rough Christmas? Here’s something to make you feel better: you’re almost definitely a better parent than New York City mayor-elect Bill de Blasio.

De Blasio’s daughter Chiara, 19, whose problems were shielded during the campaign while her father cut a popular commercial with her brother, admitted to drug abuse in a cloying Christmastime video that evoked sympathy for her “depression.” Watching the video, distributed by Mayor-elect de Blasio’s staff, makes it pretty clear why his campaign muzzled the daughter, while also offering a window into the insufferable mind of young progressive America.

“Every kid who grows up in New York grows up pretty fast,” Chiara de Blasio said in the video’s introduction, already losing the  support of audience members who live in the suburbs or rural areas or struggle with the current economic climate.

Chiara de Blasio had “depression, like clinical depression, for, like, my entire adolescence,” she said against instrumental accompaniment, noting that she also suffered from “physical insecurity.”

“When I went away to college, I didn’t really do the proper mental and emotional work to prepare myself,” de Blasio said, alienating everyone in the audience who couldn’t afford to go to college and so instead had to work in humid kitchens or build decks for a living. Also, college? Was this last year?

“I’d be like, oh, I won’t drink, I’ll just, like, smoke weed, and then I would be like, oh I’m not going to smoke weed and then I’d just drink,” she said, alienating viewers with availability problems because their weed guy is gone for the holidays.

“My therapist, who I’m so grateful for…,” she said, and that’s where we’re going to stop. At one-minute, forty seconds. She ends up going to an “institutional group therapy sort of thing” and isn’t it horrible that “a lot of people still fail to acknowledge that it’s a disease” and “we’re not providing enough treatment” and “we’re not making it an open enough environment for discussion.”

Chiara de Blasio’s video ends up lasting four minutes and fifty eight seconds. And they presumably cut some of this garbage out. Like Arianna Huffington’s daughter, who garnered acclaim for the bombshell admission that she sat around in college doing coke in her apartment, Ms. de Blasio is obviously immune to criticism for her narcissistic theatrics because she has a disease, man. Unfortunately, the disease of smoking weed afflicts mostly non-children of politicians, and the treatment is usually just expulsion from high school (or, for many young people, lengthy jail sentences).

“If you look at this video, it speaks to a whole set of challenges that we face in our society. She speaks to it with incredible courage and clarity and, you know, with a voice that really suggests an incredible wisdom for someone who’s only 19 years old,” Mayor-elect de Blasio said about his daughter’s self-absorbed video.

For the record, de Blasio once missed an 11:30 AM campaign rally because he overslept, then said, “I think we should reorient our society [to] staying up late.”

Personal responsibility isn’t a big theme of de Blasio’s New York.

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