The Daily Caller

The Daily Caller

‘YMCA’ totally not about gay sex, says Village Person

Despite the lyrics to the Village People’s dreaded wedding reception song “Y.M.C.A” totally being about gay sex during the 1970s disco era, one of the writers of the song says that it isn’t about gay sex during the late 1970s disco era.

In case you need a reminder, here are some of the lyrics that suggest the 1978 song is about having some fun with other boys at the Y.M.C.A:

Young man, there’s no need to feel down.
I said, young man, pick yourself off the ground.
I said, young man, ’cause you’re in a new town
There’s no need to be unhappy.

Young man, there’s a place you can go.
I said, young man, when you’re short on your dough.
You can stay there, and I’m sure you will find
Many ways to have a good time.

It’s fun to stay at the Y.M.C.A.
It’s fun to stay at the Y.M.C.A.

They have everything for you men to enjoy,
You can hang out with all the boys

But Village People singer and co-writer of the song Victor Willis says that the song is not about doing guys in the shower at your neighborhood Y.M.C.A.

In response to gay rights activists asking him to play the song at the Sochi Olympics later this month so as to stick it to Russia’s strict anti-gay laws, Willis told WENN that he will not perform the song as part of a protest because it isn’t about what everyone thinks it’s about.

“If they want to use the song that way, go right ahead, but I think it’s silly because the lyrics were written by me as an expression of urban youths having fun at the Y.M.C.A.,” Willis said. “The words were crafted by me to be taken any number of ways but not specific to gays. It’s much broader than that. The song is universal.”

“I don’t mind that gays think the song is about them, but I won’t perform the song in support of any protest, Willis continued. “But I would consider performing the song as part of the opening ceremonies and lead the stadium into the Y.M.C.A. dance as a show of world unity because that’s something I believe the world can relate to.”

“But I have only been asked to perform as part of a protest. And to that, I say no.”

(h/t Gawker)

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