The Daily Caller

The Daily Caller
New Jersey Governor Chris Christie exits a polling station after casting his vote during the New Jersey governor election in Mendham Township, New Jersey, November 5, 2013. REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz New Jersey Governor Chris Christie exits a polling station after casting his vote during the New Jersey governor election in Mendham Township, New Jersey, November 5, 2013. REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz  

Christie to rail against big government in inaugural address

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie will rail against the idea of a “a bigger, more expensive government” when he delivers his inaugural address on Tuesday.

The Republican governor — who won re-election in November — will be sworn into a second term during a ceremony at noon in Trenton.

In excerpts released by his office ahead of his speech, Christie will make the case for smaller government.

“I do not believe that New Jerseyans want a bigger, more expensive government that penalizes success and then gives the pittance left to a few in the name of income equity,” Christie is expected to say. “What New Jerseyans want is an unfettered opportunity to succeed in the way they define success. They want an equal chance at the starting; not a government guaranteed result.”

“We should make sure that government pursues policies that believe in the effort, talent and optimism of New Jerseyans, not in the power of almighty government to fix any problem, real or imagined,” Christie will say.

Here are the excerpts of the speech released by Christie’s office:

“The people of this state know that the only way forward is if we are all willing to take on what is politically unpopular. If we are all willing to share in the sacrifice. If we are all willing to be in this together…

“I do not believe that New Jerseyans want a bigger, more expensive government that penalizes success and then gives the pittance left to a few in the name of income equity. What New Jerseyans want is an unfettered opportunity to succeed in the way they define success. They want an equal chance at the starting; not a government guaranteed result.

“Why? Because through hard work, and being rewarded for hard work, they know they are part of their own success.

“We should make sure that government pursues policies that believe in the effort, talent and optimism of New Jerseyans, not in the power of almighty government to fix any problem, real or imagined.”