Politics
Former Republican U.S. presidential candidate Mitt Romney waits for the start of a welterweight bout between Manny Pacquiao of the Philippines and Juan Manuel Marquez of Mexico at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas, Nevada December 8, 2012. REUTERS/Steve Marcus (UNITED STATES - Tags: SPORT BOXING POLITICS) - RTR3BDG8 Former Republican U.S. presidential candidate Mitt Romney waits for the start of a welterweight bout between Manny Pacquiao of the Philippines and Juan Manuel Marquez of Mexico at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas, Nevada December 8, 2012. REUTERS/Steve Marcus (UNITED STATES - Tags: SPORT BOXING POLITICS) - RTR3BDG8  

Romney filmmaker ‘skeptical’ his documentary would have changed 2012 election

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Alex Pappas
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      Alex Pappas

      Alex Pappas is a Washington D.C.-based political reporter for The Daily Caller. He has also written for The Washington Examiner and the Mobile Press-Register. Pappas is a graduate of The University of the South in Sewanee, Tenn., where he was editor-in-chief of The Sewanee Purple. While in college, he did internships at NBC's Meet the Press and the White House. He grew up in Mobile, Ala., where he graduated from St. Paul's Episcopal School. He and his wife live on Capitol Hill.

The filmmaker behind the new Netflix documentary on Mitt Romney says he is “skeptical” his film would have changed the results of the 2012 presidential election had it aired before American went to the polls.

Director Greg Whiteley’s documentary, “MITT,” focuses on Romney and his family’s experiences during his 2008 and 2012 presidential campaigns. It features six-years-worth of behind the scenes footage of the Republican nominee and his family.

Some reviewers have noted it shows a more authentic Romney than the one seen by the public during the campaigns. It’s been suggested more voters may have accepted the Republican presidential nominee had they seen Whiteley’s Romney.

During a call with journalists on Wednesday, Whiteley noted that Romney’s son, Tagg, “felt very strongly that a film like that could come out and help him.”

“I wasn’t so sure,” Whiteley told The Daily Caller. “And I remain kind of skeptical. I think that the footage gets viewed differently during the fervor of an election.”

“Now that Mitt is not a candidate and he is not going to be a candidate, I think you can kind of relax and see the footage as it is,” he said.

Realistically, the filmmaker said, “I’m not sure how the movie could have come out before. Just because we hadn’t filmed the end yet.”

“My deal with Mitt Romney was I would not release anything until he was done running for president or he was done being president,” he said.

The documentary premiered at the Sundance Film Festival last week. It begins streaming on Netflix on Friday.

Here are other excerpts from the conference call with Whiteley: