The Daily Caller

The Daily Caller
U.S. President Barack Obama speaks about the sequester after a meeting with congressional leaders at the White House in Washington March 1, 2013. Obama pressed the U.S. Congress on Friday to avoid a government shutdown when federal spending authority runs out on March 27, saying it is the "right thing to do." REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque U.S. President Barack Obama speaks about the sequester after a meeting with congressional leaders at the White House in Washington March 1, 2013. Obama pressed the U.S. Congress on Friday to avoid a government shutdown when federal spending authority runs out on March 27, saying it is the "right thing to do." REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque  

WEINSTEIN: The failed state of Obama’s presidency

Forget the platitudes President Obama declared during his State of the Union Address: The state of Obama’s presidency, if not the Union, is not good.

If President Obama is to have any great policy legacy for history to remember, it is at this moment entirely wrapped up in the success of his health care law. The bad news for the president is four months after the launch of the Obamacare exchanges, the program is in worse shape than the law’s most vehement critics could have imagined. It is even conceivable that it could collapse entirely under its own weight.

Whether you believe Obamacare is good policy or not — and I definitely don’t — its passage was a momentous achievement for President Obama. Five years into his presidency, it may in fact be his only major one.

What else has President Obama accomplished of historical significance? Killing Osama bin Laden comes to mind, but while the president deserves credit for pulling the trigger on the operation to get America’s enemy number one, it is hard to imagine any president not authorizing the raid — or at least a missile strike.

Before the 2012 election, Washington Monthly put together a list of President Obama’s 50 greatest achievements. The bullet points didn’t look impressive then, but just over a year removed from the 2012 election, they look downright pitiful.

Obamacare comes in as his number one achievement on the list. We see how that is turning out, despite Obama’s wholly false claim Tuesday night that it has helped sign up 9 million Americans for health insurance. Obamacare is followed on the list by the president’s 2009 stimulus bill which stimulated our national debt more than our economy, and a behemoth Wall Street reform bill which has not had a majority of its rules written three years on.

Topping his list of supposed international achievements, after getting bin Laden, were ending the Iraq war, beginning the withdrawal from Afghanistan, toppling Libyan dictator Muhammar Gaddafi and telling Egyptian strongman Hosni Mubarak to go. Can any of these be seen as achievements in retrospect?

President Obama left Iraq without negotiating a status of forces agreement to leave a contingent force behind and today the success the U.S. military achieved in the Surge has been radically reversed. Far from being decimated, as President Obama claimed on the 2012 campaign trail, al Qaida now controls the largest swath of territory in its history, stretching from Western Syria into Iraq, according to terrorism expert Peter Bergen.

Leading from behind, President Obama did oust Gaddafi. But by the time of the military campaign, Gaddafi was a menace to his people, but not to America, having given up his weapons of mass destruction programs after the 2003 invasion of Iraq. Gaddafi’s removal helped lead to al Qaida-led turmoil in Mali and instability that, combined with State Department negligence, led to the death of our ambassador and three other Americans in Benghazi. Libya today is a mess and dangerous weapons pilfered in the conflict have spread far and wide across the region.

President Obama is withdrawing from Afghanistan, but how, exactly, is that a success in and of itself? Campaigning in 2008, President Obama’s goal was to defeat the Taliban and al Qaida in Afghanistan.

As for Egypt, no one considers American policy there a success — and many now long for a return of Mubarak, as ruthless as he could be.