Opinion
Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus leaves the stage after addressing the Faith and Freedom Coalition "Road to Majority" conference in Washington June 15, 2013. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus leaves the stage after addressing the Faith and Freedom Coalition "Road to Majority" conference in Washington June 15, 2013. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst  

GOP: The 1980s called, and they want their marketing strategy back

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John Jordan
Board Member, Hoover Institution
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      John Jordan

      John Jordan is CEO of Jordan Winery, co-founder of Labrador OmniMedia (creator of Tastevin, a tablet-based restaurant beverage list software), and is a member of the Hoover Institution’s Board of Overseers at Stanford University.

What the Democrats have discovered of their left-of-center base – its “micro-targetability,” based on its diversity and range of interests on specific issues – is even truer still of Republicans and conservatives, not to mention independents.

When it comes to taxes, spending, school choice, gun rights, social issues, and foreign policy, various voter sub-groups will be inclined to vote for one party or the other based on different issues. Candidates must use the latest tech tools at their disposal to speak to these groups directly, rather than delivering clunky, one-size-fits-all messaging that inspires absolutely no one.

Republicans have a choice. They can keep on grabbing their boom boxes, packing up their Huey Lewis cassettes, grabbing a cold bottle of New Coke, walking like an Egyptian down memory lane, and getting hammered by tech-savvy Democrats. Or, they can get with the 21st century marketing program – and give themselves a chance to win another national election before we hit the 2080s.