World

Iran official: US has accepted country’s nuclear enrichment

Photo of Reza Kahlili
Reza Kahlili
Contributor
  • See All Articles
  • Subscribe to RSS
  • Bio

      Reza Kahlili

      Reza Kahlili is a pseudonym for a former CIA operative in Iran’s Revolutionary Guards and the author of the award-winning book, “A Time to Betray.” He teaches at the U.S. Department of Defense’s Joint Counterintelligence Training Academy.

The U.S. has accepted the continuation of Iran’s nuclear enrichment program, an Iranian official said Sunday, a claim the Islamic regime’s media have also reported recently, citing comments by U.S. delegates to their Iranian counterparts at the Geneva 5+1 negotiations.

“The Islamic regime will never abide by the politics of America or any other country and has paid the price (through sanctions) to stick with its own policies,” Alaeddin Boroujerdi, chairman of the foreign policy and national security committee of the Iranian parliament, said in a meeting with Brazilian Senator Valdir Raupp, according to the regime’s media outlet ISNA.

In discussing the nuclear negotiations with Raupp, Boroujerdi said plainly that the Obama administration has accepted Iran’s right to continue nuclear enrichment.

Boroujerdi addressed America’s efforts to halt Iran’s enrichment activity for the last 10 years: “Today America has accepted that Iran has the right to enrichment, and a simple analysis of this fact is that America has surrendered to the will of the Islamic Republic.”

In reference to the nuclear negotiations between the 5+1 world powers and Iran in Geneva, he said that America is mistaken if it believes that it is the ultimate power.

“Currently we are engaged in the nuclear negotiations in Geneva, and in two days the new round of negotiations will take place,” he said.

A recent report by Irannuc.ir, a media outlet close to the Islamic regime’s intelligence community, also revealed that the American negotiating team has informed its Iranian counterpart that in the final agreement, to be reached within six months of the November preliminary agreement, Iran could keep enriching with as many as 4,000 centrifuges but the Iranian team responded that it would agree to 10,000. The outlet also reported that U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif are in constant contact in behind-the-scene negotiations.

Iran has negotiated its nuclear program with the U.S. and the world powers for over a decade, during which time it has successfully increased the number of centrifuges enriching uranium from 150 to over 19,000 today. It now has over 10 tons of low-enriched uranium — enough for several bombs — and has over a thousand ballistic missiles. In collaboration with North Korea, it is also working on both a nuclear bomb and intercontinental ballistic missiles.