The Daily Caller

The Daily Caller
A Chinese journalist looks out from the window of a Vietnamese airforce AN-26 during a mission to find the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 off Tho Chu islands March 11, 2014. The so-far fruitless search for a missing Malaysian airliner entered its fourth day on Tuesday, as sources in Europe, the United States and Asia voiced growing scepticism that the flight lost with 239 people on board was the target of an attack. The massive search has drawn in navies, military aircraft, coastguard and civilian vessels from 10 nations, but failed to turn up any trace of the Boeing 777-200ER that vanished about an hour into a flight from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing early on Saturday. REUTERS/Kham (VIETNAM - Tags: DISASTER TRANSPORT MILITARY MEDIA) - RTR3GJ73 A Chinese journalist looks out from the window of a Vietnamese airforce AN-26 during a mission to find the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 off Tho Chu islands March 11, 2014. The so-far fruitless search for a missing Malaysian airliner entered its fourth day on Tuesday, as sources in Europe, the United States and Asia voiced growing scepticism that the flight lost with 239 people on board was the target of an attack. The massive search has drawn in navies, military aircraft, coastguard and civilian vessels from 10 nations, but failed to turn up any trace of the Boeing 777-200ER that vanished about an hour into a flight from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing early on Saturday. REUTERS/Kham (VIETNAM - Tags: DISASTER TRANSPORT MILITARY MEDIA) - RTR3GJ73  

‘All right, good night:’ Last transmission from missing plane eerily routine, missing passengers’ phones continue to ring

The increasing bizarre case of the Malaysian flight that went missing early Saturday has added a new twist in the form of the last transmission from the plane sounding eerily routine.

“All right, good night” were the last words given to air traffic controllers before the plane vanished without a trace and has yet to be found, despite five days of multiple nations engaging in an intensive search for the plane.

The Associated Press reports that the search area is expanding to India in addition to the 35,800 square miles of Southeast Asia that are currently covered in the hunt — evidence that suggests the plane turned around and veered off course from its original flight path.

The last transmission is only the latest confusing clue in the case of the missing flight that has included the cellphones of missing passengers continuing to ring in spite of their mysterious disappearance.

China has accused the Malaysian government of incompetence in handling the case and has taken a special interest in finding the plane. Two-thirds of the passengers were Chinese nationals.

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