The Daily Caller

The Daily Caller
A Vietnamese officer stands next to a TV screen showing a flight route during a news conference about their mission to find missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 at Phu Quoc Airport in Phu Quoc Island, March 11, 2014. The so-far fruitless search for a missing Malaysian airliner entered its fourth day on Tuesday, as sources in Europe, the United States and Asia voiced growing scepticism that the flight lost with 239 people on board was the target of an attack. The massive search has drawn in navies, military aircraft, coastguard and civilian vessels from 10 nations, but failed to turn up any trace of the Boeing 777-200ER that vanished about an hour into a flight from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing early on Saturday. REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha (VIETNAM - Tags: DISASTER TRANSPORT) - RTR3GJFL A Vietnamese officer stands next to a TV screen showing a flight route during a news conference about their mission to find missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 at Phu Quoc Airport in Phu Quoc Island, March 11, 2014. The so-far fruitless search for a missing Malaysian airliner entered its fourth day on Tuesday, as sources in Europe, the United States and Asia voiced growing scepticism that the flight lost with 239 people on board was the target of an attack. The massive search has drawn in navies, military aircraft, coastguard and civilian vessels from 10 nations, but failed to turn up any trace of the Boeing 777-200ER that vanished about an hour into a flight from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing early on Saturday. REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha (VIETNAM - Tags: DISASTER TRANSPORT) - RTR3GJFL  

How YOU can help find missing Malaysian Airlines Flight 370

A U.S.-based satellite operator has dedicated two of its satellites to photograph the search areas for missing Malaysian Airlines Flight 370, and is posting the images online Wednesday to let the combined forces of the Internet join the search effort.

DigitalGlobe’s volunteer search team will have access to new images of the Gulf of Thailand, South China Sea and the Strait of Malacca to look for traces of the aircraft after it went missing an hour into takeoff over the weekend during a flight from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing.

Anyone interested in joining the search effort can find the images on the crowdsourcing website Tomnod, where the Internet’s volunteer rescue team overwhelmed the site’s servers Monday with more than 500,000 unique visitors scanning the first images. Senior manager Luke Barrington told The Wall Street Journal 100,000 users have already looked at the first images, meaning each pixel was scanned over 100 times.

The response will likely be even greater Wednesday — the site had already crashed before noon.

“DigitalGlobe is doing all of this work for free, just like the Tomnod users are doing it for free,” Barrington told the Denver Post. “That’s all part of our vision of seeing a better world and is a large reason I work here.”

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