Politics
Former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks to members of the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries during their annual convention in Las Vegas, Nevada, April 10, 2014. (REUTERS/Las Vegas Sun/Steve Marcus) Former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks to members of the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries during their annual convention in Las Vegas, Nevada, April 10, 2014. (REUTERS/Las Vegas Sun/Steve Marcus)  

Former Clinton Press Secretary Cites Hillary’s Age: Says There’s A ‘Reasonable Proposition’ She Won’t Run

Photo of Matt K. Lewis
Matt K. Lewis
Contributor
  • See All Articles
  • Send Email
  • Subscribe to RSS
  • Follow on Twitter
  • Bio

      Matt K. Lewis

      Matt K. Lewis is a senior contributor to The Daily Caller, and a contributing editor for The Week. He is a respected commentator on politics and cultural issues, and has been cited by major publications such as The Washington Post and The New York Times. Matt is from Myersville, MD and currently resides in Alexandria, VA. Follow Matt K. Lewis on Twitter <a>@mattklewis</a>.

Former White House press secretary Mike McCurry believes Hillary Clinton is “struggling” with the decision over whether or not to run — and he suspects there is a “reasonable proposition” she will decide against it.

During a recent interview, McCurry cited Clinton’s age as an argument against her candidacy, noting she would be “closing in on 70 if she got elected,” and that she was “soon to be a grandmother.” He also noted the sacrifices Clinton would have to make, including her work with the Clinton Foundation.

The comments came during an interview with Chris Riback on Taegan Goddard’s “Political Wire” podcast.

McCurry served as Bill Clinton’s White House press secretary from 1994 to 1998, and is widely regarded as one of the great modern press secretaries.

Below is an excerpt of McCurry’s remarks about Clinton:

I think she’s struggling with it. And I think, you know, she’ll be, I guess, what, 65, 66 if she would begin a candidacy, and closing in on age 70 if she got elected. And, you know, at that age — and when you start thinking about the contributions you can make — and you think about the fact that I’m also be … soon to be a grandmother — which I think is a real blessing from God in her life. And then you think about all the good things I’m doing with my husband and … my daughter and the foundation that I’m in right now. You begin to think about, well, ‘What’s the best way for me to spend my time?’ And is it to run for president, which would be — the yield from that, after a difficult and very contentious struggle — and maybe a little bitter struggle, might be that I get to the be the first female president of the United States. Okay, that’s something historically to acknowledge. But, on the other hand, against that is the ability to continue to do all the stuff that you’re doing currently. And I think there’s a reasonable proposition for her to decide, ‘Look, all the stuff I’m doing now is more rewarding than running for president and ending up back in Washington in a very polarized environment.’ [Bold mine.]

Listen to the full podcast discussion here.