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The new humanoid robot named "Kodomoroid" is pictured during a press preview at the National Museum of Emerging Science and Technology in Tokyo on June 24, 2014.  Japanese scientists unveiled what they said was the world The new humanoid robot named "Kodomoroid" is pictured during a press preview at the National Museum of Emerging Science and Technology in Tokyo on June 24, 2014. Japanese scientists unveiled what they said was the world's first news-reading android, eerily lifelike and possessing a sense of humour to match her perfect language skills. (YOSHIKAZU TSUNO/AFP/Getty Images)  

First Android Newscaster Developed In Japan

Japanese researcher Hiroshi Ishiguro unveiled androids capable of delivering the news Tuesday, i24News reports. The robots are lifelike, even using humor when speaking.

The robots were unveiled as employees of Miraikan. Miraikan is Japan’s National Museum of Emerging Science. They will interact with humans at the museums. Researchers will then analyze how humans react to the androids.

One of the robots, “Otonaroid” will work as the museum’s science communicator. She is represents an adult and even showed stage fright when speaking.

Her counterpart “Kodomorid” has an adolescent appearance and can deliver the news in a multitude of languages. She can even read tweets in a male voice.

“My dream is to have my own TV show in the future,” Kodomorid said.

JAPAN-LIFESTYLE-TECHNOLOGY-ROBOT-OFFBEAT

Kodomorid joked with creator Ishiguro saying,”You’re starting to look like a robot!” Ishiguro believes the robots will provide valuable information in the continuing development of androids.

He thinks that androids can improve human life quality. Ishiguro even uses a robot representation of himself to perform lectures abroad. “It cuts down on my business trips.”

These robots mark the increasing presence of human and technology interactions. A robot developed by Softbank named Pepper, can read human emotions and learns to behave over time. Ishiguro said,”"We will have more and more robots in our lives in the future.”