Tech

How Google Users Can Steal All Your Passwords [VIDEO]

Forget film pirating, Google Glass wearers can steal pretty much everything, from your iPad PIN to your credit card information and Social Security number.

According to CNN Money, security researchers at the University of Massachusetts in Lowell “created software that maps the shadows from fingertips typing on a tablet or smartphone. Their algorithm then converts those touch points into the actual keys they were touching, enabling the researchers to crack the passcode.” (RELATED: Brits Ban Moviegoers From Wearing Google Glass In Theaters)

In a video, cyber forensics expert Xinwen Fu explains all a hacker needs to see is your fingers moving across your smartphone, tablet or laptop.

“If they can see the screen, see your finger, then pretty much your password is stolen,” Fu said.

Fu proceeds to don Google Glass and steal CNNMoney Tech Correspondent Laurie Segall’s iPad pin.

“Ten feet away from you, a hacker can steal your password using new technology,” Segall said.

According to BGR, “while any camera-enabled device would work with the custom software, Google Glass seems to work the best for performing sneak attacks.”

“Google Glass is on your head, so it’s easy to adjust angle,” Fu said. “What if you’re using mobile banking? We can steal your bank account password.”

Clearly, this opens the door for identity theft and credit card fraud.

“Welcome to a brave new world,” Segall said.

Google, understandably, issued a blunt statement explaining Google Glass is not designed as a “surveillance device.”

“Unfortunately, stealing passwords by watching people as they type them…is nothing new,” Google told BGR. “We designed Glass with privacy in mind. The fact that Glass is worn above the eyes and the screen lights up whenever it’s activated clearly signals it’s in use and makes it a fairly lousy surveillance device.”

So why did Fu develop a software stealing passwords? CNN said Fu hopes “exposing the dangers will lead to solutions.”

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