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Central American immigrants sit atop the so-called La Bestia (The Beast) cargo train, in an attempt to reach the Mexico-US border, in Arriaga, Chiapas state, Mexico on July 16, 2014. AFP PHOTO/ELIZABETH RUIZ        (Photo credit should read ELIZABETH RUIZ/AFP/Getty Images) Central American immigrants sit atop the so-called La Bestia (The Beast) cargo train, in an attempt to reach the Mexico-US border, in Arriaga, Chiapas state, Mexico on July 16, 2014. AFP PHOTO/ELIZABETH RUIZ (Photo credit should read ELIZABETH RUIZ/AFP/Getty Images)  

The U.S. Is Using Pop Music To Discourage Illegal Immigration

U.S. Customs and Border Protection have found a new tool for fighting the immigration crisis: pop music.

According to Fox News, the hit Central American song “La Bestia” is a ballad about a dangerous train ride to the U.S. It takes its name from the dangerous train ride many immigrants take while attempting to cross the border. There have been allegations of widespread kidnapping, rape and murder along it. (RELATED: Death Train Brings Record Illegal Immigrants Into The Country)

It was also commissioned by U.S. Customs and Border Protection as part of the “Danger Awareness Campaign.” The campaign aims to discourage parents from sending their children on the dangerous ride. (RELATED: Gallup: Border Meltdown Is Nation’s Top Problem)

The ballad features background music on the marimba with mentions of the train and the dangerous street gang Mara Salvatrucha, more commonly known as MS-13. MS-13 is heavily involved in human trafficking south of the border and violent crimes in the United States.

Carlo Nicolau, the composer of the song, said he felt a little strange making the track.

“I thought I was really going to bed with the devil,” he told The Daily Beast. “I’d heard from many people that some of these Border Patrol agents are pretty shrewd. But I’ve learned that a lot of them are risking their lives to help people not die.”

The song is on regular rotation on 21 radio stations in three different countries.

Listen here.