Entertainment

Killjoy: Neil deGrasse Tyson Can’t Help But Crap On The Science Of Star Wars

Astrophysicist, author and activist Neil deGrasse Tyson is viewed either as the smartest man on the planet, or a political hack known for making up quotes to attack Republicans. Star Wars fans on both sides of the aisle can now add joyless jerk to that list.

Tyson took it upon himself to complain about the “science” featured in the world’s most popular movie — “Star Wars: The Force Awakens.”

In a series of tweets, Tyson managed to mention no plot points, nothing about hardly anything about the characters and never once says whether or not he even liked the movie.

After announcing his “observations” to follow, Tyson immediately brought up politics.

Starting off lighthearted enough, he commented on the “cuteness” of the new droid compared to an old one.

Then, inexplicably, rather than comment on the movie itself, Tyson goes after the “cuter” droid’s ability to function.

Still unable to enjoy the movie as a movie, Tyson is compelled to point out there is no sound in space.

After that observation, he then ruins the entire concept of villain’s super-weapon.

Still having nothing to do with a review or “thoughts” on the movie itself, Tyson makes it about himself.

Next, he focuses on what one character is eating in one scene, rather than the plot, characters or action.

Then came an attempt at humor.

Again, nothing about the movie itself, just an attempt at humor.

Tyson then appears to admit he spent a good deal of his time in the theater looking at the background of the space scenes and not much on the story.

He then points out what has been long mocked in pop culture like it’s the first time anyone has ever said it: a parsec is a measure of distance, not time.

It having been a few tweets since he’d made his observations about himself, Tyson returned to his favorite subject.

And just to put a fine point on the fact that he doesn’t understand the appeal of the Star War franchise or care…

In his final tweet, and sticking to his apparent policy of not mentioning anything from the movie itself in his “observations,” Tyson concludes:

In typical Tyson style, his first three choices for “best Hollywood Aliens” are not shown in their respective movies: “2001: A Space Odyssey,” “Contact” and the original “Invasion of the Body Snatchers.”