Education

Study: Children Of Same-Sex Parents More Likely To End Up Depressed, Suicidal

A new study reveals that 51 percent of young-adult children of gay couples report ongoing bouts of depression, compared to just 20 percent for young adults raised by typical (male-female) parents.

The study, which was first pointed out in the Public Discourse by University of Texas at Austin sociology professor Mark Regnerus, was carried out by Catholic University sociology professor Paul Sullins, who examined data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health.

According to the study, 18.3 percent of adolescents being raised by typical parents reported depression, compared to 21.8 percent of adolescents raised by same-sex parents. By young-adulthood, though, the depression rate among children of typical parents dropped to 19.7 percent, while the depression rate of those raised by same-sex parents skyrocketed up to 51 percent.

Additionally, those raised by same-sex parents were more likely to be suicidal both as adolescents and as adults.

According to the study, 13.6 percent of those raised by typical parents reported suicidality at age 15, while 43.5 percent of those raised by same-sex parents reported the same. By age 28, just 7.1 percent of those raised by typical parents reported suicidality, compared to 30.1 percent of those raised by same-sex parents.

More than 93 percent of children raised by gay parents reported feeling “Distant from one or both parents” at age 15, compared to a little under 36 percent of those raised by typical parents. By age 28, more than 43 percent of those raised by typical parents reported feeling distant from one or both parents, while the rate for the children of same-sex couples dropped — to just under 73 percent.

Children of same-sex parents are also significantly more likely to be obese both as adolescents and as young adults.

By age 15, almost 31 percent of children raised by same-sex parents were obese, while almost 14 percent of children raised by typical parents were obese at the same age. By age 28, more than 37 percent of the kids raised by typical parents were obese, compared to almost 72 percent of those raised by same-sex parents.

A study published in April by the Williams Institute — a far left think tank — found that LGBT parents were more likely to get frustrated (and even angry) with their children than typical parents.

The authors of that study relied on data from just 98 lesbian couples to make their case.

Follow Peter Hasson on Twitter @PeterJHasson