Energy

Scientist Tells NYT Climate Models Are As Fake As Trump’s Hair

A scientist and global warming skeptic applied for a climate change editor position at The New York Times to help it show readers how climate models fail more often than celebrity marriages.

Meteorologist Mathew Briggs wrote a blog post Monday titled, “The New York Times Is Looking For A Climate Change Editor: That’s Me!” which offered the NYT a few pointers on how to do better reporting on climate science.

Some of his suggestions were glib, while others were insightful.

“I envision a series,” Briggs wrote, “in which we expose the schemers” and “bamboozlers” whose knowledge about the Earth’s climate, “is as artificial as that thing perched on Donald Trump’s cranium.”

He posted the comments on his website: “William M. Briggs: Statistician to the Stars.”

Briggs’ comments were part of a cover letter addressed to NYT editors Dean Baquet and Sam Dolnick for an open climate change editor position advertised in the paper. The old publication tends to give short shift to scientists espousing skepticism about so-called man-made global warming.

“The coverage should encompass,” the advertisement reads, “the science of climate change; the politics of climate debates; the technological race to find solutions; the economic consequences of climate change; and profiles of fascinating characters enmeshed in the issues.”

The newspaper should consider tweaking its coverage slightly, Briggs explained, simply by showing its readers, “that global warming models have failed at higher rats than Larry King’s marriages.” Briggs was referring to former cable news show host Larry King, who has been married eight times to seven different women.

Briggs had other suggestions as well.

Instead of focusing on how global warming and politics intersect, Briggs added, why not “screw people’s heads back on straight” and give them something tangible to fear, like the “rise of politics dictating science and the corrupting influence of money.”

He concluded his snarky missive by asking if the newspaper wouldn’t mind plugging his book.

“I’ve written a best-seller (my mom bought two copies) on the subject. I know this is a presumptuous question, but if I get the job can I get this reviewed in the Book Review? Might boost sales.”

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