Education

Student Shares Video Critical Of Islam, Gets Fired From College Newspaper

An Oregon college student lost his job at the school newspaper after he tweeted a video of a Muslim student admitting his religion killed nonbelievers, according to an article he wrote concerning the incident Friday.

Andy Ngo, former multimedia editor for the Vanguard at Portland State University, posted a video and brief commentary from an “Unpacking Misconceptions” religion panel he attended before losing his job, according to a column he published in National Review.

“At Portland State interfaith panel today, the Muslim student speaker said that apostates will be killed or banished in an Islamic state,” tweeted Ngo on April 26.

“And some, this, that you’re referring to, killing non-Muslims, that [to be a non-believer] is only considered a crime when the country’s law, the country is based on Koranic law — that means there is no other law than the Koran,” the Muslim student said at the panel, according to the tweets. “In that case, you’re given the liberty to leave the country, you can go in a different country, I’m not gonna sugarcoat it. So you can go in a different country, but in a Muslim country, in a country based on the Koranic laws, disbelieving, or being an infidel, is not allowed so you will be given the choice [to leave].”

Breitbart included the former multimedia editor’s tweet in an April article, and Ngo asserts that his editor-in-chief Colleen Leary and managing editor Tim Sullivan then met with him.

Leary purportedly called Ngo “predatory” and “reckless,” stating the former multimedia editor had risked Muslim students’ lives as well as the lives of his family. She claimed that Ngo had “violated the paper’s ethical standards” by not “minimizing harm” directed at the speaker and had “a history” of indirect association with conservative outlets that damaged the newspaper’s reputation. Leary proceeded to fire Ngo.

Ngo told The Daily Caller News Foundation that he received $1,900 per quarter at the Vanguard and worked for 15-20 hours a week.

“From the ideologues within the paper, the reaction was hostility and aggression,” Ngo told TheDCNF. “Most of them were quick to cut off any ties to me, as if I was suddenly branded untouchable– or deplorable.”

“The Vanguard’s decision in this matter is guided by standards outlined in the SPJ Code of Ethics,” Leary told TheDCNF, citing the guidelines suggesting that journalists “minimize harm” and “provide context.”

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