US

Google Researcher: Porn Featuring Violence Against Women Is More Popular Among Women Than Men

The popular feminist narrative would have you believe that porn is largely consumed by men, and that depictions of violent — or at least rough — sex would be a primarily male-dominated interest.

This is untrue, states researcher Seth Stephens-Davidowitz, who says that porn featuring violence against women is significantly more popular among women compared to men.

His findings might explain the popularity of the BDSM-heavy “Fifty Shades of Grey” series of novels among female readers.

Speaking to Vox in an interview about how Google data proves that most Americans lie about their sexual preferences, the researcher and author of “Everybody Lies” asserts that more women enjoy the genre compared to male porn watchers — despite common sense and politically correct claims to the contrary.

“Porn featuring violence against women is also extremely popular among women,” said the author. “It is far more popular among women than men.”

“I hate saying that because misogynists seem to love this fact,” he added. “Fantasy life isn’t always politically correct.”

Stephens-Davidowitz calls Google’s data a “digital truth serum.” With an illustrious career in academia, the researcher has produced extensive volumes of original research into the field of big data, published in academic journals and The New York Times. He presently serves as a quantitative analyst at Google, where he researches internet searches to understand human behavior.

Americans aren’t the only people susceptible to self-deception, claims Stephens-Davidowitz.
“The rate at which women watch violent porn is roughly the same in every part of the world. It isn’t correlated with how women are treated,” he stated.

The researcher also highlighted a curious instance in India, where the number one search for “my husband wants…” ends with breastfeeding, and that porn featuring adult breastfeeding is more popular in India compared to anywhere else.

“In just about every country, just about every Google search looking for advice on breastfeeding is looking how to breastfeed a baby,” he said. “In India, Google searches looking for breastfeeding advice are about equally split between how to breastfeed a baby and how to breastfeed a husband.”

Likewise, another oddity comes from Japan, where at least 10 percent of the porn-related searches involve tickling. The author says calling these preferences “weird” isn’t the correct response.

“The data from porn tells us that everybody is weird,” he said. “Thus, nobody is weird.”