Business

JP Morgan To Donate To SPLC And ADL After Charlottesville

JPMorgan will donate $1 million to the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) and the Anti-Defamation League (ADL) in response to the violent protests that took place in Charlottesville, Va., in early August.

Peter Scher, head of corporate responsibility and chairman of JPMorgan, wrote a letter to staff Monday wherein he asserted the bank “stands in support of all those who reject racism and violence,” and pledged to support both the SPLC and ADL in their campaign of “tracking, exposing and fighting” hate groups and other extremist organizations.

Scher announced that the bank will launch a two-for-one match for employee donations to groups that promote human and civil rights.

Apple’s CEO Tim Cook announced Thursday that the company would donate $1 million a piece to both the SPLC and ADL. Cook also said that he will match Apple employees donations two-for-one to either of those groups or other human rights organizations through the end of September, which could be where Scher got the idea. (RELATED: Apple Gives $1 Million To SPLC In Wake Of Charlottesville)

JPMorgan’s CEO Jamie Dimon wrote a letter to staff following the Charlottesville protests.

“I strongly disagree with President Trump’s reaction to the events that took place in Charlottesville over the past several days,” Dimon said. “There is no room for equivocation here: the evil on display by these perpetrators of hate should be condemned and has no place in a country that draws strength from our diversity and humanity.”

President Donald Trump faced an onslaught of negative press and attacks from congressional Republicans last week, who said the president did not do enough to specifically call out the perpetrators of the violence in Charlottesville. The protests ended in injuries and one death after a car allegedly driven by a white supremacist barreled into a crowd Saturday afternoon during clashes between white nationalists, Black Lives Matter, Antifa and other groups.

The president said in the wake of the protests on Aug. 14 that he condemned violence on “many sides,” but he failed to call out white supremacist groups specifically. Trump amended his comments the following afternoon, saying that he thinks there is “blame on both sides.”

Chief executives from top U.S. companies left the president’s manufacturing, strategy and policy forum councils Wednesday afternoon in response to the president’s remarks.

Dimon notably served on the president’s strategy and policy forum council and heads the Business Roundtable, one of the most prominent lobbying groups in Washington, D.C.

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